Q01 NORTH ANDERSON DRIVE

 

2 Pumps, 1 Incident Support Unit, (HRV & DCU Pods), Wholetime.

 

Stations

1948? to 1968

Temporary Fire Station North Anderson Drive

27/6/1968 to 2008

19 North Anderson Drive, ABERDEEN.                                                                       Photo

8/12/2008 to New station to north of HQ. 19 North Anderson Drive, ABERDEEN                      Photo

The new station went Operational at 2pm on 11/11/2008 and was Officially Opened on 8/12/2008.

 

Firemasters

 

As Aberdeen, North Eastern and Grampian Fire Brigades

 

 

Appliances

 

?

GLE816

Austin K2/Home Office

ATV

?

GLE818

Austin K2/Home Office

ATV

?

GSA999

Dennis F7/Magirus 85’

TL

1952

HSA590

Dennis F8/Dennis

WrT

?

JSA68

Dennis F8/Dennis

WrT

?

LSA9

Dennis F21/Dennis/Metz 100’

TL

?

NAV150

Land Rover 108/Carmichael

L4P

1958

PAV923

Dennis F26/Dennis

DP

1958

PAV924

Dennis F26/Dennis

DP

1960

TSA980

Dennis F26/Dennis

WrT

1960

TSA981

Dennis F26/Dennis

WrT

1960

TSA982

Dennis F26/Dennis

WrT

1962

WSA957

Dennis F26/Dennis

WrT

1962

WSA958

Dennis F26/Dennis

WrT

1962

WSA959

Dennis F26/Dennis

WrT

1963

YSA624

Dennis F36/Dennis

WrT

1964

BSA672B

Dennis F36/Dennis

WrT

1966

ESA597D

Austin FFG/Federal Industries

CaV

1966

EAV434D

Dennis F36/Dennis

WrL

?

NAV835H

AEC Mercury 7(Ergo)/Bennet/Simon SS65

HPP

1971

RAV703J

Land Rover 108/Carmichael

L4P

1974

XSA128M

Dennis F48/Dennis

WrL

1974

XSA129M

Dennis F48/Dennis

WrL

1974

XSA130M

Dennis F48/Dennis

WrL

1975

HSA450N

Dennis F48/Dennis

ET

1976

MSA978P

Ford D1114/HCB Angus

WrL

1979

GSS9V

Ford D1617/CFE

WrL

1979

GS10V

Ford D1617/CFE

WrL

?

WSE290Y

Dodge G1313/Multilift

PM

1982

WSE291Y

Dodge G1313/Carmichael

WrL

1982

WSE292Y

Dodge G1313/Carmichael

WrL

1983

A995DSS

Scania G82M/Angloco/Metz

TL

1985

B998KSO

Dodge G10/Mountain Range

RT

?

D458WSS

Land Rover 110

L4V

1987

D358VSA

Dodge G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1987

D359VSA

Dodge G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1987

D362VSA

Dodge G13/Mountain Range

DCU

1988

E808ASA

Renault G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1988

E809ASA

Renault G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1988

E812ASA

Scania 92M/Saxon/Simon SS263

HP

1989

F429GSA

Renault G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1989

F430GSA

Renault G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1989

F431GSA

Renault G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1990

FSO662V

Stonefield P5000/GFB

Cliff Rescue Unit

1990

G313MSA

Renault G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1990

G314MSA

Renault G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1990

G315MSA

Renault G13/Mountain Range

WrL

1991

H286SSA

Scania 93M-210/Mountain Range

WrL

1991

H287SSA

Scania 93M-210/Mountain Range

WrL

1992

J124UDU

Land Rover Discovery/GFB

FCU

1992

J447XSO

Scania 93M-210/Reliance Mercury

WrL             

1992

J448XSO

Scania 93M-210/Reliance Mercury

WrL

1992

J449XSO

Scania 93M-210/Reliance Mercury

WrL

1993

K284FSO

Scania 93M-210/Emergency One

WrL

1993

K285FSO

Scania 93M-210/Emergency One

WrL

1993

L743KRS

Scania 93M-210/Emergency One

WrL

1993

L744KRS

Scania 93M-210/Emergency One

WrL

1993

L745KRS

Scania 93M-210/Emergency One

WrL

1993

L244LRS

Kawasaki Mule

ATV

1995

M992PSS

Scania 93M-210/Emergency One

WrL

1995

M993PSS

Scania 93M-210/Emergency One

WrL

1996

N402XRS

Scania 93M-250/Multilift/Emergency One

PM/HRV

1997

P91ERS

Scania 94M-220/Multilift

PM

 

1980

Received 1 Ford D1317/Angloco

1981

Received 1 Scania/Metz 30m Turntable Ladder

1983

Received 1 Water Tender Ladder and 1 Water Tender

1985

Received 2 Dodge G13 appliances

1986

Received 2 Dodge G13/Mountain Range WrL & 1 Dodge G13/F&W FoST

1987

Received 2 Dodge G13/Mountain Range

 

 

First

Second

Third

Aerial 1

Aerial 2 Canteen Van Control Unit Line Rescue

Rescue

ISU DIM

1980

GSS11V

GSS12V

MSA978P

LSA9

NAV835H ESA597V    

HSA450N

   

1990

G313MSA

G314MSA

G315MSA

E812ASA

       

B998KSO

   

1992

J447XSO

J448XSO

J449XSO

E812ASA

       

B998KSO

   

1998

M992PSS

M993PSS

 

E812ASA

    J124UDU D458WSS

B998KSO

   

1998

R336RSA

R337RSA

 

A995DSS

    J124UDU D458WSS

N402XRS

   

2000

X991NSA

R336RSA

 

A995DSS

    J124UDU D458WSS

N402XRS

   
2003 R336RSA               N402XRS    
2004 SV53CNY                 SV53CNO  
2005 SV53CNY X991NSA               SV53CNO  
2006 SV53CNY SV55CFO               SV53CNO  
2008 SV58ASU SV58ASX               SV53CNO SV02GXM
2010 SV58ASU SV58ASX               SV53CNO MX58FHT
2012 January SV61AWU SV61AWX               SV53CNO MX58FHT
2014-4-22 SV14BJJ SV14BJK               SV53CNO MX58FHT
2017 SV65OYL SV65OYM               SV53CNO MX58FHT

 

LSA9

Dennis F14/Dennis

TL

ESA597D

Austin FGE/Federal Industries Aberdeen

CaV

NAV835H

AEC/Mercury/JC Bennett/Simon 85

HP

HSA450N

Dennis F48/Dennis

ET

MSA978P

Ford D1114/HCB Angus

WrT

GSS11V

Ford D16117/CFE

WrL

GSS12V

Ford D16117/CFE

WrT

A995DSS

Scania 92M/Angloco/Metz

TL

B998KSO

Dodge G10c/Mountain Range

RU

D458WSS

Land Rover 110

LRU

E812ASA

Scania 92M/Saxon/Simon SS2263

HP

G313MSA

Renault G13c/Mountain Range

WrL

G314MSA

Renault G13c/Mountain Range

WrL

G315MSA

Renault G13c/Mountain Range

WrT

J124UDU

Land Rover Discovery

FCU

J447XSO

Scania 93M-210/Reliance Mercury

WrL

J448XSO

Scania 93M-210/Reliance Mercury

WrT

J449XSO

Scania 93M-210/Reliance Mercury

WrT

M992PSS

Scania 93M-220/Emergency One

WrL

M993PSS

Scania 93M-220/Emergency One

WrT

N402XRS

Scania 93H-250 4x4/HIAB-125/Multilift

PM/HRV

R336RSA

Scania 94D-220/Emergency One

WrL

R337RSA

Scania 94D-220/Emergency One

WrL

X991NSA

Scania 94D-220/Emergency One

WrL

SV02GXM Ford Galaxy (Temporary vehicle) DIM
SV53CNO Scania 94D-300/Saxon/Moffat Mounty ISU
SV53CNY Scania 94D-230/Emergency One (10 man cab) WrL
SV55CFO Scania 94D-340/Emergency One (10 man cab) WrL
MX58FHT Iveco 65 DIM
SV58ASU Scania P230/Emergency One (10 man cab) WrL
SV58ASX` Scania P230/Emergency One (10 man cab) WrL
SV61AWU Scania P280 CP28/Emergency One WrL
SV61AWX Scania P280 CP28/Emergency one WrL
SV14BJJ Scania P280/Emergency One WrL
SV14BJK Scanis P280/Emergency One WrL
SV65OYL Scania P280/Polybilt/JDC RP
SV65OYM Scania P280/Polybilt/JDC RP

The 10 man cab is to carry additional equipment the crew is still a max of 6.

SV14BJJ and BJK are the first red appliances in the former Grampian area since 1998.

 

The Prime Mover has the Rescue Pod HRU1 on it and the other Pods kept at the station are Canteen Pod Cav1, Support Pod ISU1,Education Pod FEU and Display Pod ComEd1.

The former second pump from North Anderson Drive has been relocated to the Bridge of Don to the north of Aberdeen. This new station has not yet been constructed, but its appliance and station staff are currently being accommodated at Central fire station, which previously covered the Bridge of Don area.
A new station is required at Bridge of Don as Grampian Fire Brigade are unable to meet the the response times for that area. from the present stations. (2003)

Pods kept at the station are Canteen Pod Cav1, Support Pod ISU1,Education Pod FEU and Display Pod ComEd1.
The Incident Support Unit is funded by the Scottish Executive as part of the New Dimension Project. It carries the equipment that was on the HRV Pod along with the Urban Search & Rescue Equipment (USR) supplied by the Scottish Executive. The Mass Decontaminated Equipment is kept in one of the bays and if required the USR equipment is taken off and the Mass Decontamination put on.  (Aug 2004)

Pod on Station 2008
Urban Search & Rescue Unit (USAR3)

Pods on Station 2011
Urban Search & Rescue Unit (USAR3)
Incident Command (ICU75)

Pods on Station 2012
Urban Search & Rescue Unit (USAR3)

 

 

Brigades

? to 1941

Aberdeen City Fire Brigade

1941 to 1948

National Fire Service

1948 to 1975

North Eastern Fire Brigade

1975 to 2003

Grampian Fire Brigade

2003 to Grampian Fire and Rescue Service (name change only)

Notes

24/1/2005 North Anderson Drive was upgraded to a Strategic Station and the Bridge of Don pump stationed at Central was brought back to NAD to make it 2 pumps once more. The decision had been taken several years ago to make it Non Strategic which meant the station could be left empty and unmanned.

North Anderson Drive had a call sign of 77 in Grampian Fire and Rescue Service, this was changed to Q01, the new National Call Sign, when the Control at Mounthooly closed on 8/11/2016.

 

 

The North Eastern Fire Area Administration Scheme Order, 1948

  Equipment Wholetime
  1 Pump Escape 2 Company Officers
  3 Self Propelled Pumps 4 Section Leaders
  1 Turntable Ladder 4 Leading Firemen
  1 Towing Unit with Light Pump inside towing Major Pump 38 Firemen and Watchroom Attendants
  1 Wireless Car  

 

 

The North Eastern Fire Area Administration Scheme Order, 1952

King Street and North Anderson Drive had between them :-

  Equipment Wholetime
  2 Turntable Ladders 4 Company Officers
  9 Pump Appliances 8 Section Leaders
  1 Other Operational Vehicle 8 Leading Firemen
    76 Firemen including 3 Watchroom Attendants

 

Establishment 2000

 

Equipment

Wholetime

 

2 Water Tender Ladders

4 Station Officers

 

1 Prime Mover

? Sub Officers

 

 

? Leading Firefighters

 

 

? Firefighters

 

Establishment 2003

 

Equipment

Wholetime

 

1 Water Tender Ladder

4 Sub Officers

 

1 Prime Mover

4 Leading Firefighters

 

 

32 Firefighters

 

Brigade’s new workshops opened in Aberdeen

<PHOTO> Members of the North Eastern Fire Area Board, accompanied by Aberdeen’s Lord Provost John M. Graham, have a look round the North Eastern Fire Brigade’s new workshops and central stores at North Anderson Drive, Aberdeen, which the Lord Provost officially opened yesterday.

 

N.-E. FIRE ADVANCE TO SAVE MONEY

Money spent on building up Britain’s fire fighting services would prove, in the long run, to be money well spent.
This was the sentiment echoed by Lord Provost John M. Graham of Aberdeen yesterday, when he officially opened the new workshops and central stores of the North Eastern Fire Brigade at North Anderson Drive.
The stores, built at a cost of £110,000, are the first phase in the development of the Board’s new operational and administrative headquarters-at present centred in King Street.
"In recent years the cost of fire in Britain has been going up at an alarming rate," said the Lord Provost. "Even the considerable expenditure that has been involved here is likely, in the end, to prove cheap when one realises the hazards the equipment has been designed to prevent."

Skilled service

Lord Provost Graham added that the opening of the workshops registered an advance made by a proficient service, for the whole of the North East of Scotland.
It was the fruit of a great deal of thoughtful, careful and skilful planning.
Earlier, Firemaster W. H. Woods said that there had been a certain amount of criticism about building the workshops and stores before the new fire station itself.
But he emphasied: "We consider this to be one of the most important parts of the service.
"Without well maintained machines and appliances which we know will not break down, we would not have an adequate fire fighting service."
More than fifty members of the Board, along with civic and county dignitaries, attended yesterday’s opening ceremony, which was presided over by Councillor G. Roberts, Board chairman.
(Aberdeen Press and Journal, October 11th, 1963.)

 

£100,000 FIRST PHASE OF FIRE-FIGHTING PLAN

W. P. PAUL

It’s a small boy’s-and a fireman’s dream-come true. Translating it into reality cost about £110,000. And it’s money well spent on mechanical marvels and modern equipment for the North Eastern Fire Brigade at their new workshops and central stores in North Anderson Drive, Aberdeen. Lord Provost John M. Graham gave it the official "go" yesterday afternoon. There are 161 vehicles, pumps and appliances and seventy auxiliary portable pumping units attached to this brigade and due to the restricted workshop accommodation at the present H.Q. in King Street, maintenance vans were sent to each station for the inspection off vehicles. Now, with the opening of the new workshops, each vehicle and pumping unit will be brought into them for periodic checks at regular intervals.

A central station

This marks the completion of phase one in a progressive development plan-and it’s quite a plan. It all began way back in the pre 1939 days before Hitler set the world on fire. Aberdeen Town Council acquired a seven acre site, on part of which the new building now stands, to provide a central fire brigade station for the Aberdeen City Fire Brigade, as it was then.
During the "life" of the National Fire Service a temporary fire station was built there to provide cover for the expanding west end of the city, and on the transfer of the N.F.S., the North Eastern Fire Area Joint Board was constituted, responsible for fire fighting arrangements within the County of the City of Aberdeen, the counties of Aberdeen, Banff and Kincardine, and the joint county of Moray and Nairn.
Policy of the board is to further develop the site by the eventual provision of new operational and administrative H.Q. for the whole of this area. The workshops are designed to deal with the repair and maintenance of all the brigade vehicles and appliances and to economise in manpower by a combined mechanical and general stores for the provision of all other ancillary equipment throughout the operational zone. This of course means functional efficiency in all departments.
The area covered is 19,250 sq. ft., comprising main central workshop, 120 x 70ft., with lateral workshops along the two long sides. On the north side are located compressor section, tyre maintenance and store, oil store, machine shop, engine and unit fitting section, engine and component cleaning bay and battery and electrical section.

Extraction system

On the south side are the high pressure vehicle cleaning bay, pump testing bay, blacksmith’s shop and joiner’s shop. An extraction system has been installed to remove vehicle exhaust fumes during tests and tuning operations.
Boilerhouse, cellulosing shop and store are in the west wing, while the east wing, 70 x 60 ft., incorporates the mechanical and general stores, including tailoring shop, storekeepers and workshop offices, mess rooms, kitchen, locker room and toilet accommodation.
The central section of the main workshop, 120 x 30ft., is 35ft.high, designed to accommodate turntable ladders and escapes when extended for adjustment and repair. The plant house is sufficiently large to include the boiler plant for the H.Q. building.
Space heating throughout the entire workshops is provided by a low pressure hot water central heating system incorporating high level unit heaters which deliver warm air downwards into the working area. The stores and office section are heated by an underfloor hot water system.
Construction comprises steel framing with single pitched roof 120ft. long with an overall width of 90ft., and to obtain the necessary height of 35ft., two main longitudinal girders of 120ft. span are carried on heavy stanchions in the gable. The roof is covered in aluminium sheeting and lined inside with insulating material. Natural light is obtained from a large window in each gable and by patent roof glazing.
Gantries are carried on the frame and roof construction. Two three-ton trolleys run on beams erected along the full length of 120ft. on the south side. Two separate 1½ ton trolleys opposite the machine and engine shop on the north side are installed for the suspension of components over two work and inspection pits, the larger being about 30ft. in length.
Alongside the later are two twin-post lifts which facilitate the servicing of vehicles, and there is an oil disposal unit and ten grease and oil lines. A brake tester is capable of handling both light and heavy vehicles. It is installed opposite one of the main west doors.
This major development all adds up to the North Eastern Fire Brigade becoming one of the slickest and most efficient fire fighting organisations in Scotland, backed by the latest equipment for repair, maintenance and servicing. And in the offing, probably next year is a new main fire station and administrative H.Q.
<PHOTO> Of the building (no caption)
<PHOTO> An interior view of the new fire brigade workshops in Aberdeen
<PHOTO> Twin post lifts and an oil disposal unit in operation at the new workshops. A senior fire officer discusses details with the brigade's transport chief.
<PHOTO> A section of the stores, suggesting the multiplicity of items stocked.
(Aberdeen Press and Journal, October 11th, 1963).

 

It’s the best in Britain

NEW FIRE H.Q. WILL SOON BE FINISHED

Rapidly taking shape is the new headquarters of the North Eastern Fire Brigade on Anderson Drive.
Unlike the traditional fire station, this one when complete, will be the blueprint for the fire stations of the seventies, and "essentials" like the fireman’s pole will play a minor roll.
Efficiency is the keynote in any fire service, and during the gradual transfer from King Street to North Anderson Drive the efficiency has continued to improve rather than suffer.
Despite increased traffic causing more chaos on our roads, it is still the proud boast of the fire service that they can cover a fire at any point in Aberdeen within seven minutes of notification. Central areas are covered in a much shorter time.
The impression of the new HQ is one of space and cleanliness. The new workshops and central stores-phase one of the new HQ-were officially opened in October of 1963. At the same time the old system of using firemen to maintain and service vehicles was terminated.

Overhauled

The workshops are manned by civilians and every one of the 120 vehicles stationed at the 40 fire stations in the area covering Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Banff, Kincardine, Moray and Nairn is overhauled at regular intervals.
The administration involved in this operation is considerable, because reserve vehicles have to take the place of their regulars during their period in "dock".
Firemaster William Woods, always to the forefront with ideas, was responsible for the basic design of the workshops, and visitors cannot help but be impressed by the up-to-date machinery and cleanliness.
The roof of the workshops is impressively high. This is to allow vehicles with turntables to be tested indoors. The traditional red fire engines are almost out in this area now being replaced by aluminium vehicles which have a greater heat resistance, are easier and cheaper to maintain and are as easily identified by the public.
The central stores attached to the workshops carry several thousand £’s of equipment. Everything from stockings for firewomen to spare resuscitation gear, electric bulbs, spare engine parts, hoses, etc.
The store too is spacious and leaves room for expansion in the future. On the end of the workshops is the spray paint bay which is maintained at a constant temperature of 70 degs. All vehicles are regularly painted where necessary and, according to the Firemaster, that includes the parts underneath, which are not visible.
Several of the vehicles, I noticed had wooden ladders, and I was surprised to learn from Firemaster Woods that wooden ladders are still reckoned to be better than metal ones for many jobs.
They are safer where there is a danger of electricity; they are more resistant to fire than metal, and they are more easily maintained in their workshops where new sides, rungs, in fact complete ladders, can be rebuilt.
Also on the seven acre site is the Firemaster’s house.

Gymnasium

On the south side of the yard are the buildings, under construction, which are to house the administration and operational sections of the HQ.
These buildings of two storeys will not be completed for some time, but attached to them is a gymnasium, where the firemen will keep fit when not attending lectures.
This is another aspect of the modern fire service. The men are not standing or sitting about idle all day. They are constantly being kept up to date on the latest industrial and technical developments and have regular keep-fit sessions.
In the operations wing there is to be storage for equipment and dormitories with 31 beds, adjacent to the appliances room. This is to ensure a speedy get-away.
In this section, too, will be two poles for quick access from the assembly hall, and also a spectators’ gallery for the benefit of visitors who are encouraged to see the Fire Service operating.
The gallery will facilitate the watching of fire fighting, which will be carried out in another new building under construction.
This building is so adaptable that the firemen can even simulate a typical ship’s hold and the type of fires that break out in them.
Also under construction is a 90ft. tower which is to have conventional windows facing on to North Anderson Drive. On the other side will be built in every conceivable type of window, metal and wooden frames, sliding windows, ones that open out. These will enable firemen to practice entering and leaving all types of buildings.
<PHOTO> Part of the new workshops.
(Evening Express, 14/2/1967).

 

‘Elbow room’ at N.E. fire fighters’ new HQ

AN EFFICIENCY BLEND

Space is the keynote of the handsome new headquarters on North Anderson Drive in Aberdeen for the North Eastern Fire Area Joint Board-space and colour, to make the fire brigade ever more efficient. More space for equipment, for training, for office work, for leisure moments.
The brigade moved into their new home last February (operational) and March (administration) but it is due to be officially opened today for inspection by a distinguished invited audience, by Lord Provost Robert Lennox, with Provost George Wood, Portsoy, chairman of the joint board, in the chair.

U-shaped

On a fine open site of seven acres, the HQ is now approached by the new dual carriageway which is embellished with roses. The building, a discreet blend of traditional and modern styles and materials, using granite, synthetic granite and red brick with concrete, is designed by Aberdeen architects Allan Ross and Allan for a total cost of £335,000 (plus £20,00 for control basement and AFS garages).
The two storey plan is U-shaped, with the main façade dominated by the wooden, electrically operated folding doors of the six appliance bays which have immediate access to Anderson Drive. Above the bays is a large assembly hall and at either side two wings faced in granite.
Both wings are entered from the sides of the building under sloping cantilevered concrete canopies. The north wing is the HQ of the fire board, with boardroom, firemaster’s office, administrative offices, control room, drawing office, photographic room (with dark room) and medical room.
The south wing is the Aberdeen operational fire station with easy access to the appliance bay, where there is a canteen tender, an emergency tender-which can generate it’s own electricity-two pumps capable of pumping 1000 and 600 gallons of water a minute respectively and two turntable ladders.

Three shifts

The station office is beside the bays with boards indicating the names of the 26 men on each of the three shifts.
The south wing has all facilities for the officers and men on and off duty. There is a large, well equipped kitchen, with dining rooms, airy dormitories with beds, three guest bedrooms for visiting firemen, lavatories, lockers and recreational rooms, including a TV lounge, a quiet room for study and reading, a billiard room and a large gymnasium.
Throughout the station there is bright colour-even the appliance bays, with a red tile floor, a pale blue ceiling and grey tiled end walls. The boardroom is resplendent with dark blue carpet, panelled walls, red chairs and pale blue ceiling. The desks and chairs in the administrative offices are of various colours. The firemaster’s room has a rich red carpet. The gymnasium is in gold and pale green, toning with the wooden equipment.

 

CONTROL OF 3622 SQUARE MILES

The control room is the heart of the new station. This vital place is manned by day entirely by four or five women under Mrs Margaret Young, assistant group officer, who has been a firewoman for 12 years. At night the men take over.
Everything looks extremely calm, cool and efficient so that anyone can see at a glance what is going on in the entire fire area of 3622 square miles with a population of 450,000 who make an average of 2500 calls every year.
The brain of the control room is the console-a large desk carrying all communication systems. There are automatic fire alarms installed in large business premises, GPO telephone switch board for calls from the public, VHF radio links to all stations, with four repeater links; a public address system, an internal telephone system, switches to open the appliance bay doors, and links with five subsidiary desks in the room to take urgent calls for immediate action. One girl handles it all.
On the walls of the control room is a large map showing the boundaries of the fire area, which stretches from Forres in the North west to North Water Bridge beyond Inverbervie in the South east, taking in everything east of Grantown and all Deeside.
Forty Two fire stations are marked with coloured pins on the map to denote the type of appliance stationed there. Alongside the map are two control panels with a light beside the name of each station which turns red when the local brigade is called out. The pin is then transferred from the map to the panel.
Another chart shows the number and placing of non mobile appliances available-such as foam equipment, breathing apparatus and resuscitation apparatus-indicated by moveable discs.

Training is a constant and essential part of every fireman’s day. The facilities at the new HQ in Aberdeen are quite exceptional, as visitors will discover for themselves from the excellent vantage point of the unique covered concrete cantilevered balcony, giving a bird’s eye view of the huge drill yard, the practice tower, 90 feet high, and the practice smoke chamber.
The tower, of red brick and concrete, has windows on two sides-one set open for training with hook ladders, the other complete with casements and glass. Inside there is a two man automatic lift and life like 11st dummies waiting to be rescued. The remainder of the tower is used for drying hose, which is electrically hoisted to the top.
The smoke chamber has three levels, with trap door and a variety of windows. Intense heat can be turned on the entire place filled with smoke to simulate the real thing. The layout can also be used to simulate fire in a ship’s hold by starting the exercise with the firemen at the top and making their way down ladders into the "hold." There is an outside relief staircase and the smoke can be quickly cleared through ventilation louvres in the aluminium roof.
Firemen must be in top physical condition. Now for the first time, physical training will be added to their normal drill-in the fully equipped gymnasium in the main building. The training will be given by staff officers who, among them can boast many skills, including karate.
Maintenance of all the appliances in perfect order is another high priority. The workshops in Anderson Drive are the most up to date in the country and service all vehicles for the whole fire area.
All the latest appliances have body work in embossed aluminium, which is much less easily marked than the old red paint. There are, altogether 60 fire appliances of all kinds in the fire area-six being at Anderson Drive and three at King Street.

Replacement

There is a constant replacement programme to ensure that the fire brigade is right up to date with the latest equipment. One new appliance was delivered this month and three are due shortly.
The network of stations is kept up to date also. After the new HQ there will be new stations at Keith, Aberlour and Granton on Spey.
The new fire station is at present in charge of Mr John Donnachie, assistant fire master, with Mr W. H. Woods, firemaster, on sick leave and due to retire in November.
Mr Donnachie has taken a close personnel interest in the new HQ devising many of the bright colour schemes himself and preparing a special illustrated brochure for visitors to the official opening ceremony.
He has a staff of nine senior officers, six fire prevention officers, 10 administrative staff and 14 control room staff, with 79 operational firemen on three shifts of 26 men.
The entire fire area has a full time strength of 168 firemen, 26 civilians, 485 part time retained men and 22 volunteers with 60 appliances in 40 stations plus (two volunteer stations).
<PHOTO> The 90ft. practice tower which is used for simulated fire fighting of outbreaks in modern tall buildings.
(Aberdeen Press and Journal, 27/6/1968.)

Forum set on Tesco scheme

Supporters and opponents of plans for a £7 million superstore in Aberdeen will get a chance to state their views at a special meeting next month.
A development plan departure hearing into Tesco's application for the Grampian Fire Brigade site in North Anderson Drive is being held in the Town and County Hall at the Town House on Wednesday, March 7.
It will start at 10.30am and is likely to extend into the afternoon.
The city council's planning committee will visit the site earlier in the morning.
About 80 objections have been lodged against the application.

Welcome

A council spokeswoman said that although members of the public were welcome to attend the hearing, only those who had made representations to the planning department before the end of last year would be able to address the committee.
No decision would be taken at the hearing, but officials would prepare a report to help the committee reach a decision later.
"The process will allow all parties to express their views on the application in front of the planning committee," said the spokeswoman.
The main issues are likely to include traffic and retail policy.
Tesco has offered, in return for the HQ site, to build a new HQ for the brigade at Rousay Drive, Summerhill, and new fire stations at Kingswell and Bridge of Don.
(Aberdeen Press and Journal, Saturday 17th February, 2001. Page 3.)

The Workshops and Central Stores opened on the 11th October, 1963
The Station became operational in February 1968 and was officially opened on the 27th June, 1968

 

North Anderson Drive
Fire Station
 

Grampian Fire and Rescue Service

 

<PHOTO> The plaque unveiled by Rt Hon Alex. Salmon MP MSP, First Minister of Scotland, on 8 December 2008 to mark the official opening of the new North Anderson Drive Fire Station. 

contents 

welcome to North Anderson Drive                   Page 4
location, location, location                                 Page 6
operations                                                             Page 8
building success                                                  Page 12
doing our bit for the environment                     Page 14
our place within the community                        Page 16
a hint of the past                                                  Page 17
thank you very much                                          Page 18 

welcome to North Anderson Drive

<PHOTO> North Anderson Drive Community Fire Station. This picture of the new Fire Station was taken on the day that it was handed over to Grampian Fire and Rescue Service by the contractors. 

The new North Anderson Drive Community Fire Station is the latest addition to Grampian Fire and Rescue Service’s portfolio and the first fire station the Service has built with both the community and the environment in mind from day one.
The striking design incorporates everything that a busy operational fire station will need. A large four-bay fire appliance room that can house a mixture of operational fire vehicles such as pumping appliances, height vehicles, command vehicles and major incident response vehicles takes up the majority of the floor area. There is a fully equipped ICT suite that supports better communications and e-learning. Mobile ICT equipment can be moved into other lecture spaces to assist in classroom learning and is available for a wide variety of other uses such as incident debriefs. Office accommodation is available for the Station Manager and further office space given over to the administrative support required in the station. A fully equipped gymnasium allows station personnel to maintain operational fitness levels, with shower and locker rooms immediately adjacent. An extensive and well lit drill area completes the station layout.
In addition to all the operational areas, the building has a large community accessible room available. Doubling as the fire station’s lecture room through the day and as a rest area at night, the room may be split into two distinct spaces, is equipped with a small galley-style tea and coffee point and has ICT and presentation capabilities. The community area is separated from the operational fire station so concerns over visitor health and safety and building security are minimised. With the addition of a high-contrast colour scheme, induction loop hearing systems, accessible toilets and controllable lighting, the possibilities for the station are limitless.
The environmental elements of the design are mostly hidden from view. The use of ground source heating for the entire building is a new approach for the Service and will both contribute to a greener fire station and reduce its carbon footprint by more than 34 tonnes of CO2 each year. The building’s insulation far exceeds today’s stringent recommendations. Windows make use of gas-insulated panels and reflect heat back into the building. For firefighter training, equipment testing and simple maintenance like washing the fire appliances, mains water use is minimised by the use of a rainwater harvesting system. Inside the building all taps and showers are fitted with aerated heads meaning less water is used to the same effect. All pipework is fully lagged and even the toilets have low-volume flush mechanisms.
This fire station has a long life in front of it. The design and construction methods used will ensure that it remains fit for purpose today, tomorrow and in the many years to come. 

location, location, location

<DRAWING> (street map showing location of station) There has been a Fire Service presence at the North Anderson Drive site for many years. The opening of our new station enhances fire and rescue services for the City of Aberdeen.
The “old” North Anderson Drive Fire Station and Headquarters has been a landmark on the Aberdeen skyline since its opening on 27th June 1968 by the North Eastern Fire Brigade. Sited at the top of North Anderson Drive, the huge red doors and seven-storey training tower are a familiar sight to Aberdeen’s residents and visitors alike. With the opening of the new North Anderson Drive fire station the landscape changes a little but the new station’s sweeping lines and bold design ensures its place as a continuing landmark in Aberdeen.
The old fire station and headquarters building will continue to be used by Grampian Fire and Rescue Service for the foreseeable future. The administrative functions of the service, such as Personnel, Finance, Communications, Health & Safety, etc. have been based there for the last forty years and, although a number of plans have been laid for changes on the site, none have yet come to fruition.
The tools that the modem fire and rescue service uses to plan where its resources — fire stations, people, equipment, vehicles, etc. — are placed clearly show that the North Anderson Drive location is ideal to protect the immediate vicinity and, with excellent road links to the north, south and west of the city, as well as immediate access into the city itself, ideally placed to offer the best response to incidents that happen further afield.
The fire station has been planned, designed and built for a projected forty years of operational life. The old station completed forty years and six months of service on 11th November 2008, when the crews of Station 77 went operational from the new station for the first time. While every possible planning parameter has been used in defining the final location of this new station, it is interesting to consider what the reality of 2048 might bring.
<PHOTO> The drill tower at the North Anderson Drive site has marked our position on the Aberdeen skyline for many years. 

operations

<PHOTO> Operational fire crews stand beside world class fire appliances. Grampian Fire and Rescue Service was the first fire service in the United Kingdom to move to white appliances.
The North-Anderson Drive fire station is a busy workplace twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. A total of fifty four people are based in the station. Known within the organisation by its callsign “Station 77”, it primarily serves the communities of the north and west of Aberdeen, but operational necessity can take crews well outside this area. Last year the station was turned out an average of five times a day in response to 999 calls to fires, road accidents, flooding, rescuing people trapped, and offering advice. The station is also equipped with highly specialised rescue equipment to assist the national programme of Scottish and UK resilience in the event of a major incident occurring.
The vehicles and equipment that all firefighters use are of a very high standard and regularly updated and improved. A continuous schedule of training, including lecture based training, e-leaming, and practical hands-on drills are used to ensure that everyone is completely familiar with the tools of our modem fire and rescue service. This keeps our front-line staff safe, ensures that we can make the best response possible no matter the type of incident and thereby protect those who live, work, visit and travel in the North East of Scotland.
All of this coupled with an extensive programme of community fire safety and education gives our staff a varied, interesting and challenging role.
Fifty four people are based in the North Anderson Drive fire station. Fifty-two operational firefighters are split into four Watches of thirteen each, made up of one Watch Manager, two Crew Managers and ten Firefighters. There is one Station Manager who is also Operational, and one non operational administrative support person.
Shifts are made up of two dayshifts from 08:00-18:00, followed by two nightshifts from 18:00-08:00, followed by four rest days.

North Anderson Drive Station 77 Activity 2007 

Total Number of Incidents                                 1,755
Primary Fires (1)                                                      281
Secondary Fires (2)                                                 592
Road Traffic Collisions                                            50
Special Services (3)                                                 139
False Alarm - Defect/Good Intent                        639
False Alarm - Malicious                                           54 

(1) Primary fires are those involving: buildings, vehicles, agriculture and forestry, outdoor plant and machinery, bridges, tunnels, etc; those involving casualties or rescues; and those that are attended by more than five fire appliances.
(2) Secondary fires are those involving single derelict buildings, derelict vehicles, grassland, refuse, refuse containers and intentional straw and stubble burning.
(3) Special Services include responding to Road Traffic Collisions, people rescues, animal rescues, flooding and offering advice.
This table gives a flavour of the level of activity that the new fire station can expect. Further to answering calls, significant time and effort is spent in community fire safety activity, training, e-learning and practical drills.
<PHOTO> This picture shows some of Scotland’s mass decontamination equipment. Grampian Fire and Rescue Service is one of three Scottish fire and rescue services with a Scottish Government provision for major incident response.
<PHOTO> Chief Officer David Dalziel tightens the last bolt in the steel frame during the construction of the new building. A number of new and innovative techniques were used throughout the process.
<PHOTO> The ground source and underfloor heating system is a significant contribution to the new fire station’s green credentials.
<PLAN OF STATION> 

Floors                                                     1, plus mezzanine electrical and service plant room
Height                                                    7.7m to highest part of roof
Frontage                                                52.1m
Width    (accommodation)                  14.3m
(appliance bays)                  
                25.3m
(total)                                    
                39.6m
Cost                                                        £3,100,000 

Construction
Steel frame construction fabricated offsite and delivered for assembly. Concrete floor with underfloor heating system. Ground based heating. Systems of insulated panels forming wall cores with block and render external finish. Standing seam roof fabricated onsite and completed during installation. Timber linings use renewable source low maintenance cedar wood with exposed nail heads. Soffits, vents and louvers all maintenance free construction. Windows are argon filled double glazed for insulation and use energy saving heat reflective glass. Motion sensitive controls for lighting with automatic switch off. Low energy lighting throughout. Automatic door closing. Rainwater harvesting system in place. Full building electrical backup supply from diesel generator. Electronic door entry systems and CCTV coverage of building and site. Emergency lighting activation on power failure. Water management and water use reduction systems. Pipework insulation throughout. High contrast colour scheme. Induction loop hearing assistance. Accessible toilet facilities with high and low-level emergency call panels. Forced air ventilation. Electrical, air handling and ICT plant all contained on mezzanine floor. Training/drill area fully lit with energy efficient lighting. All external courtesy and safety lighting is energy efficient with automatic control.
<PHOTO> Front of station with an appliance. 

building success

<6 PHOTOS> Site during construction.
<6 PHOTOS> Showing features of the new building. 

doing our bit for the environment

<SKETCH> The building heating systems are supported and augmented by an innovative renewable energy technology called ground source heating. A series of eight pipes are placed vertically to a depth of 100m. Water is passed through the pipes and heated by the natural warmth of the ground before being carried to the building. For every unit of electricity used to run the system, between three and five units of heat are obtained.
<SKETCH> Fire and Rescue Services have to make use of water during regular training, and for simple tasks like washing vehicles. To reduce the environmental impact of our activities, a system of rainwater harvesting has been designed that uses the large roof area, as well as the training area, to collect and store rainwater for later use. In dry spells the storage tank is topped up from the mains water supply.

With funding support from the Scottish Community and Household Renewables Initiative (SCHRI) Grampian Fire and Rescue Service has installed a Ground Source Heat Pump to provide heat from a renewable energy source.
By reducing their reliance on energy derived from fossil fuels, the system contributes to the reduction of carbon emissions, which helps combat climate change.
SCHRI provides advice and funding support for householders and groups In Scotland to develop renewable energy projects. The scheme is funded by the Scottish Government and managed Jointly by the Energy Saving Trust and Highlands and Islands Community energy Company. 

Type of system:                                   Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP)
Power output:                                       59kw (th)
Estimated energy generated:              328,205 kWh p.a.
Total project cost:                                £87,617 (GSHP)
Estimated financial savings:               £2,534 p.a. 

Carbon dioxide savings:                     34.4 tonnes p.a 

<PHOTO of spray tap> Inside the building, sinks and showers are fitted with sensors to switch them on when needed and ensure that they are turned off when not required. Spray fittings on taps mean less water is used to the same effect. Toilets are dual flush and low water use throughout. Hot water pipes are fully lagged to minimise heat loss.
<PHOTO of light sensor> The building is being fitted with low energy lighting wherever practical throughout. The lighting in corridors and public areas is controlled by a system of sensors that switch on lights when required and switch them off again when no one is around. Lighting is further controlled by the turnout equipment which will ensure that lighting is automatically switched on whenever a turnout takes place, contributing to a safe and healthy workplace. Externally, the training area, access pathways and parking areas are covered by high pressure sodium lighting which is the most energy efficient available.
<DRAWING> The insulation of the building is to a particularly high standard and internal heat loss is restricted by doors and air baffles. Windows are fitted with solar reflective glass to reduce glare and help keep the building at a comfortable temperature. The double glazing window panels are filled with argon gas which is a better insulator than air and enhances heat retention in the building considerably. When fire crews leave the building in response to a 999 call, the heat in the building does not leave with them. 

our place within the community

The fire station has been designed from the outset with the community in mind. A distinct separation between the operational fire station area and extensive community facilities minimises the concerns over station security and the health and safety of staff and visitors alike.
The large lecture room is fully equipped with audio/visual and presentation facilities and can be set up with theatre style seating for up to fifty six people. The room’s flexibility is further enhanced by the ability to sub divide it into two smaller meeting rooms. An induction loop system for hearing impaired users, fully adjustable lighting, and high contrast colour schemes help ensure accessibility for the widest range of people. Accessible toilets and a galley style tea and coffee point complete the community elements of the fire station.
Usage arrangements are being developed by the Service and information for community groups who would like to make use of the facility is published on the Service website at www.grampianfrs.org.uk/community
<PHOTO> Grampian Fire and Rescue Service already has a number of its fire stations available for community use. North Anderson Drive joins stations as widely spread as Elgin, Dyce and Banchory in contributing to the local communities of the North East of Scotland. 

a hint of the past

<PHOTO> A picture of the North-Eastern Fire Brigade station in the mid 1940s. The station was located almost exactly on the place where the new station stands.
The modern sweeping curves of the fire station design are an accidental reflection of the fire station that stood on the same site in the 1940’s. The station then was part of the North Eastern Fire Brigade and was the base for two pumping appliances and a turntable ladder. The station was located almost exactly on the place where the new station stands.
The Station’s canine mascot, a black Labrador named Terry, served along with the firefighters of the time for almost nine years. Today’s station crews and the North East Scotland Fire Heritage Society remember Terry’s place in the Service’s history by placing at the front of the station the marker erected by the firefighters of 1948.
<PHOTO> “Terry” the station’s mascot shown on the turntable ladder at North Eastern Fire Brigade’s North Anderson Drive Station. 

thank you very much

This ceremony marks the end of almost three years of effort in the planning, design, construction, commissioning and now the opening of Grampian Fire and Rescue Service’s new North Anderson Drive Community Fire Station.
A huge number of people have been involved throughout this time and it is but right that the Service offers its grateful thanks to…
Rt Hon Alex Salmond MP MSP First Minister of Scotland for opening the Station
Chief Fire Officer David Dalziel for his leadership in taking us from vision to reality
Grampian Joint Fire and Rescue Board members and especially Convener Mike Raeburn for supporting and enabling the development of this new Community Fire Station
Revd Jim Weir, Service Chaplain, for dedicating the Station
Mr James Clark (GFRS Retd) and the North East Scotland Fire Heritage Society for their support and added colour at the opening ceremony
Mr James (Jimmy) McHardy (GFRS Retd) for joining us at the opening ceremony and reminding us where we came from
Group Manager Fraser Burr for co-ordinating the project throughout
Station Manager Ed Miller for the huge amount of work in managing the project from start to finish
Data Intelligence staff for risk modelling this location for the Station
Mr Douglas Skinner for his efforts in handling the ICT works throughout
Mr Stephen Field for his work in preparing the communications systems
Aberdeen City Command staff for their efforts in planning and development
Group Manager David Rout for co-ordinating operational preparation
Station Managers Sean Cox arid Davie Pattinson for their efforts in commissioning the new station
The new station development lead team of Deputy Chief Officer Richard Haigh; Head of Finance Jane Burr; Treasurer Mr Charles Armstrong; and Clerk to the Board Mr Neil McDowaII
The staff of Red, White, Green and Blue Watches of North Anderson Drive for all their help, patience, effort and hard work in getting the new station ready for use and going operational for the first time at 2pm on 11 November 2009
Mr Maurice Dodd for photographing the progression of the work
Ms Carol Knight for logistical and administrative support
Aberdeenshire Council Architects Department for their work in planning and design
Mansell Construction, and in particular Mr Alan McComb and Mr Alan Donald as our local contacts
…and also to
Grampian Fire and Rescue Service’s ICT Department, Personnel Department, Finance Department, Central Support Services, Health & Safety Department, Graphics Design Department, Research and Development Department, Fire Control Room, Vehicle Workshops, Supplies Department, Learning and Development Department, Contracts and Procurement Department, Fire Safety Department, Ms Joan Robertson (Equality & Diversity), Ms Jillian Burns (Media & PR), and everyone else who has been involved in the development of the North Anderson Drive Community Fire Station.

 

 

If you know of any mistakes in this or have any additional information please let me know.

 

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