L03 BATHGATE

1 Pump, 1 Incident Support Unit, Wholetime, 1 Pump Retained.

Stations

1936 to 1956 Old Mine Rescue Station, Muir Road, BATHGATE.
17/2/1956 to 24/4/1992 Glasgow Road, BATHGATE.
24/4/1992  A89, east end of BATHGATE. EH47 7BW.                  Photo

Officers in Charge

 

 

 

Appliances

 

 

Muir Road

GLE813 Austin K4/Leyland HU
GYR688 Bedford QL 4x4/Home Office WrT(A)
GGX662 Austin K2/Home Office/SEAFB HrT

 

Glasgow Road

  First Retained ET ISU WRU AFS
1964 LSF999 LSF997 BFS330B     NYR123
1969 OWS998G LSF999 BFS330B      
1970 UWS61J OWS998G BFS330B      
1976 VMS278R OWS998G BRS330B      
1978 VMS278R OWS998G FSX273T      
1980 RFS24V OWS998G FSX273T      
1982 RFS24V LSF403T FSX273T      
1984 HSG739X LSF403T A451LND      
1990 B631JFS NSX347Y A451LND      
1992 G871FFS NSX347Y A451LND      
1998 P664NSX C227RSC A451LND      
1998 P664NSX L281NSC A451LND      
2000 P664NSX L281NSC   W674PSF    
2001 W462RSG L281NSC   W674PSF    
2004 SN04CMX L281NSC   W674PSF    
2005 SN04CMX Y689BSX   W674PSF    
2007 SK07BKO Y689BSX   W674PSF    
2012 SN12DKY Y689BSX   W674PSF    
20/7/2016 SN12DKY SK07BKU   W674PSF    
2017 SN12DKY SN09BKA   W674PSF    
Nov 2017 SN12DKY SN09BKA   W674PSG SF64CJE  
June 2018 SN12DKY SN09BKA     SF64CJE  

 

NYR123 Bedford Green Goddess EP
LSF997 Bedford SLZG/HCB PL
LSF999 Bedford SLZG/HCB WrT
BFS330B Land |Rover FC101/Merryweather ET
OWS998G Dennis F108/Dennis WrL
UWS61J Dennis F108/Dennis WrL
VMS278R Dodge K1113/Hestair Eagle WrL
FSX273T Dodge KC50/L&B FB ET
RFS24V Dodge G1313/Angloco WrL
LSF403T Dodge G1313/HCB Angus WrL
HSG739X Dodge G1313/Fulton and Wylie WrL
NSX347Y Dodge G13c/Mountain Range WrL
A451LND Dodge S66/Mountain Range ET
B631JFS Dodge G13c/Mountain Range WrL
C227RSC Dodge G13/Alexander WrL
G871FFS Dodge G13c/Fulton and Wylie WrL
L281NSC Scania 93M-250/Emergency One WrL/ET
P664NSX Scania 94D-260/Emergency One WrL/ET
W462RSG Scania 94D-260/Emergency One WrL
W674PSF Scania 94G-260/Total Fleet ISU
Y689BSX Scania 94D-260/Emergency One WrL/ET
SN04CMX Scania 94D-260/Emergency One WrL/ET
SK07BKO Scania P270/Emergency One WrL/ET
SK07BKU Scania P270/Emergency One WrL/ET
SN09BKA Scania P270/Emergency One WrL/ET
SN12DKY Scania P280/Emergency One WrL/ET
SF64CJE Mercedes Sprinter/Carmichael WRU

Y6689BSX was rolled in an RTC on 20/7/2016 and written off. 

When the new HRU went on the run at Sighthill in June 2018 the ISUs at Bathgate and Galashiels came off the run.

Brigades

1941 to 1948 National Fire Service
1948 to 1975 South Eastern Area Fire Brigade
1975 to 2005 Lothian and Borders Fire Brigade
2005 to 2013 Lothian and Borders Fire and Rescue Service
1/4/2013 Scottish Fire and Rescue Service

 

Notes

 

The South Eastern Fire Area Administration Scheme Order, 1948

 

Equipment

Whole-time

Retained

 

1 Self-propelled pump

1 Company Officer

 

 

1 Tender and Large Trailer Pump

2 Section Leaders

 

 

1Water Tender

2 Leading Firemen

1 Leading Fireman

 

 

16 Firemen & Watch Room Attendants

9 Firemen

 

 

 

 

Bathgate had a call sign of 54 in Lothian and Borders Fire and Rescue Service, this was changed to L03, the new National Call Sign on 3/5/2017.

 

MINISTER OPENS FIRE STATION

Bathgate Ceremony

Declaring open a new fire station at Bathgate yesterday, Mr Henderson Stewart, Under Secretary of State for Scotland, said that the South Eastern Fire Area Joint Committee had achieved their aim at a time when the Prime Minister had given the warning that a tight rein must be kept on public expenditure.
"It is our firm intention, however, to do our best with the resources available," he continued. "We thoroughly appreciate the important part that good accommodation plays in the efficiency of the fire service."
Referring to fire prevention work, Mr Henderson Stewart said that practically all brigades now had a section of specialist officers who devoted themselves to this task. One of their main duties was to give advice on the best arrangements for preventing fires in public and private buildings. Unfortunately this free service was neither sufficiently known nor sufficiently used by the public.
The station, which cost more than £30,000, is the first new whole time station to be built in the South Eastern Area Fire Area since the war. Councillor Ian A Johnson-Gilbert, Edinburgh, chairman of the joint committee, presided at the opening.
(The Glasgow Herald, 18th February, 1956. Page 7.

 

NEW FIRE STATION OPENED
Ceremony at Bathgate
SERVICE COMPLIMENTED ON EFFICIENCY
 

The first new round-the-clock fire station to be built in the South East of Scotland since the war was opened at Bathgate last Friday by Mr J Henderson Stewart, M. P., Joint Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Scotland.
Sited on the Glasgow Road, the new station was built despite difficulties in the restriction of capital investment, local difficulties in securing a suitable site and exceptional difficulties caused by flooding during construction.
Mr Henderson Stewart said that the completion marked the end of a long journey and everybody who had a hand in it was to be congratulated on a triumph of patience and perseverance.

CENTRE FOR WEST LOTHIAN

From what he had seen of it, the station was obviously well planned and constructed, and had first class facilities for operational and recreational needs. “Altogether we have the conditions here to inspire the highest standards of firefighting efficiency.”
Mr Henderson Stewart said the people of West Lothian would be especially glad to see the station finished. It would be a “parent” for other stations in the county by helping them to put out their fires, and, when fully completed, it would offer training facilities never before available.
It had been the hard economic facts alone which caused delay in the building, but he hoped the Joint Fire Committee of the area would feel their patience had been rewarded. They had achieved their aim at a time when the Prime Minister had warned that a very tight rein must be kept on public expenditure.
The Government fully realised the importance of improving fire service accommodation where it was below standard and thoroughly appreciated the important fact that good accommodation played in the efficiency of the service.

PREVENTION BETTER THAN CURE

“The efficiency of the Fire Service,” he said, “is a matter that touches us all. Controlled fire is an ancient ally and friend of man. Uncontrolled, it is a deadly enemy. Fire losses are heavy, and place an added strain on the nation’s economy.”
Mr Henderson Stewart paid tribute to Mr A. B. Craig, Firemaster of the South Eastern area, and to his officers and men. They had a proud record, which was recently enhanced still more by the remarkable way they handled two major fires (in Jeffrey Street and Princes Street) simultaneously.
But preventing fires was even better than extinguishing them. Fire prevention was a branch of fire brigade work which had gained increasing recognition in recent years. The South Eastern Brigade were among the leaders in this vital service.
Unfortunately, this free service was neither sufficiently known nor sufficiently used by the general public. How much we would all gain by using it he could not estimate but it must amount to a very large sum each year.
Concluding, Mr Henderson Stewart referred to the place of the Fire Service in war. He said it was comforting to know that the Auxiliary Fire Service in Bathgate was a strong unit, and he congratulated its men and women on their public spirit. “If the test should ever come – which God forbid – they and their comrades throughout the whole Fire Service will not be found wanting”
(Gazette, Friday, February 24, 1956 Page 7)

 

£40,000 FIRE STATION AT BATHGATE
Opening Ceremony By Mr. Henderson Stewart, M.P.

<PHOTO> of the three bays with appliances in them.
The recently completed fire station at Bathgate was officially opened last Friday afternoon by Mr J. Henderson Stewart, M. P., Joint Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Scotland. The new building, which is the latest of its kind in the South East Scotland Fire Authority Area, is situated in Glasgow Road near Easton Colliery and will serve not only Bathgate but a large surrounding area in West Lothian.
The ceremony took place in one of the bays used for one of the three fire tenders kept at the station.
Among those present were Provost John Graham, convener of West Lothian County Council; Firemaster A. B. Craig and Assistant Firemaster R. T. Wylie, both of the South Eastern Area; Firemaster Davidson, of the. Central Area; Firemaster Chadwick. of the Glasgow Area, and Mr Wilson, H. M. Inspector of Fire Service; and Mr Bryce Anderson, firemaster, Bathgate.
Mr Henderson Stewart said the completion marked end of a long journey and everybody who had a hand in the project was to be congratulated on a triumph of patience and perseverance.

Ideal Conditions

From what he had seen of it, the station was obviously well planned and constructed, and had first-class facilities for operational and recreational needs. “Altogether we have the conditions here to inspire the highest standards of fire-fighting efficiency.”
Mr Henderson Stewart said the people of West Lothian would be especially glad to see the station finished. It would be a “parent” for other stations in the county by helping them to put out their fires, and when fully completed, it would offer training facilities never before available.
It had been the hard economic facts alone which caused delay in the building, but he hoped the Joint Fire Committee of the area would feel their patience had been rewarded. They had achieved their aim at a time when the Prime Minister had warned that a very tight rein must be kept on public expenditure.
The Government fully realised the importance of improving fire service accommodation where it was below standard and thoroughly appreciated the important part that good accommodation played in the efficiency of the service.

Deadly Enemy

“The efficiency of the Fire Service” he said, “is a matter  that touches us all. Controlled fire is an ancient ally and friend of man. Uncontrolled, it is a deadly enemy. Fire losses are heavy, and place an added strain on the nation’s economy.”
Mr Henderson Stewart paid tribute to Mr A. B. Craig, firemaster of the South Eastern Area, and to his officers and men They had a proud record, which was recently enhanced still more by the remarkable way, they handled two major fires (in Jeffery Street and Princes Street) simultaneously.
But preventing fires was even better than extinguishing them. Fire prevention was a branch of fire brigade work which had gained increasing recognition in recent years. The South Eastern Brigade were among the leaders in this vital service.
Unfortunately, this free service was neither sufficiently known nor sufficiently used by the general public. How much we would all gain by using it he could not estimate, but it must amount to a very large sum each year.
Concluding, Mr Henderson Stewart referred to the place of the Fire Service in war. He said it was comforting to know that the Auxiliary Fire Service in Bathgate was a strong unit, and he congratulated its men and women on their public spirit. “If the test should ever come — which God forbid — they and their comrades throughout the whole Fire Service will not be found wanting.”

Importance of West Lothian

Councillor Ian Johnston-Gilbert, of Edinburgh, chairman of the Joint Fire Committee who presided said that in these days of capital restrictions the opening of a new fire station was not only an important event but a matter for gratification.
So far as the South East Scotland Fire Authority were concerned the opening of the station was a landmark in the history of the Joint Committee. The Committee by building the station in West Lothian had recognised not only the importance of the county, but also the fact that it was an area where there were many industries and agricultural interests for whom an up to date station was essential.
Proposing a vote of thanks to Mr Henderson Stewart and the chairman, Mr John Graham convener of West Lothian County Council, confirmed West Lothian’s pleasure that this new fire station had been built within the county. The question would naturally arise as to who was going to pay for it. Of course, it would cost a lot of money but he was sure that the people of the Lothians would get good value for their money in the service it would provide. Mr Graham went on to contrast the present high efficiency of the Fire Service with the early attempts at fire fighting when the art was just beginning. He said that the demonstration the brigade had just given was an example of what could be achieved by “working to rule.” If all other attempts at “working to rule” were as successful it would much better for the country.
He thanked Mr Henderson Stewart for the interest he had shown and for taking time off from a very busy life to come to Bathgate. He praised the work of the chairman and the Joint Fire Committee and his committee and said that they were doing a magnificent job in face of great difficulty in organising an adequate and very efficient firefighting service for the area they served.
After Mr Henderson Stewart declared the building open two detachments of firemen manned the two authority tenders and ran them outside in a mock turnout to an imaginary fire.

Description of the New Station

Of modern design the new fire station provides ample accommodation for appliances and equipment. From the outside the building's main feature is the three huge double doors through which the fire tenders pass. There are three of these tenders, two of which are the property of the fire authority and the third is owned by H. M. Government and is for the use of auxiliary firefighters. All three machines are practically new. The floor of this part of the building and in the adjoining locker room where the men keep their clothes and personal belongings is laid with red tiles. There are three double doors to the rear where the fire tenders can be taken out for washing and cleaning purposes. The main entrance door to the left of the building gives access to a small hallway off which are the Company Officer’s room and the station control room. In the control room there is a large switchboard for telephones and alarm bell systems which is constantly manned. A double window provides ample lighting and a large scale map of the area is fixed to the wall facing the switchboard operator.
From the adjacent locker room access can be had to the dormitory, lavatory and bath apartments and from the main hall at the entranceway a stair leads down to store rooms beneath this part of the building which could be converted time of emergency to concrete protected operational and living quarters. At the far side of the building, beyond the garage space lies the kitchen, dining room and recreation room There is also lavatory accommodation on this side of the building. In nearly all parts of the building apart from the garage and locker rooms the floors are of highly polished inlaid wooden squares. To one side of the building is a petrol pump for refueling the tenders and the company officer’s house is immediately adjacent. There are attractively set out plots which will probably be planted with flowers and vegetables in season.
Following the opening ceremony Mr Henderson Stewart and the others present were hospitably entertained by West Lothian County Council in the Co-operative Hall, Bathgate.
(West Lothian Courier, Friday, February 24, 1956. Page 9.)

New fire station open
By Stratton Williams

Bathgate’s new £1.7 million custom-built fire station was officially opened last Friday.
Eric Milligan, convener of Lothian Regional Council performed the ceremony in front of other dignitaries at the Starlaw roundabout site.
In his remarks, Lothian and Borders Firemaster, Peter Scott gave an insight into the reasons behind the need for the new station.
“In response to a Government request to review standards of fire cover to various locations, it was found that an area in the west side of Livingston did not comply with the requirements of cover, and it was felt necessary to relocate the existing station.
“The precise location of the new station was arrived at by way of test runs and the present site was found to be the best in satisfying both required attendance times for the Bathgate station and attaining attendance times for the west side of Livingston,” he said.
Mr Scott said he was convinced that the new station, together with the dedicated people who man it, would efficiently serve the people of Bathgate and West Lothian for the foreseeable future.
The new station shows Lothian and Borders Fire Board’s commitment to the highest quality of public service.
Not only is Bathgate station a station for today, but is one which will not look out of place in the 21st century, they say.
It has a modern facade and a practical yet comfortable interior which will fully meet the demands that a 24-hour emergency operation requires.
The board also say that access to the main road network couldn’t be better, and will help them achieve the required attendance times.
The plan of the building is a unique progression from the ‘T’ form of many stations. The station areas in the new building radiate from the muster area, reflecting the need to crew up and be on the road as quickly as possible.
Our picture shows Lothian Regional Council convener, Eric Milligan in pole position as Firemaster Peter Scott looks on.
See also page 6.
(Courier, Friday, May 11, 1992. Page 15.)

 

 

If you know of any mistakes in this or have any additional information please let me know.

 

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