V06 PARKHEAD

1 Aerial Rescue Pump, Wholetime. CLOSED.

Stations

Wartime to 1952                                Tollcross Fire Station, 43 Corbett Street, Glasgow E2.               Photo

4/12/1952 to 29/3/2011                      Cuthelton Street, Tollcross, GLASGOW. G31 4QZ.                    Photos

 

Firemasters

 

                                                                                                Glasgow then Strathclyde Firemasters.

 

Appliances

 

  Bay 1 Bay 2 Bay 3
1953 Fordson PE with front mounted Barton Pump Leyland Comet Pump Extra Heavy Duty Pump
  HrT Trailer Pump Extra Heavy Duty Pump

The Pump Escape carried a jumping sheet and for drills the men would hold it taught under the Drill Tower and the Company Officer and Section Leader would jump into it. The above information was told to me by Bill Cook on 28/3/2011.

  Bay 1 Bay 2 Bay 3
1952? JUS784 AYS524 TPAS ?? (Dennis Rolls Royce PE)
  HrT   Light Trailer Pump
      Heavy Trailer Pump

The Hose Reel Tender was used for chimney and grass fires and to tow the Trailer Pumps when they were required. Wallace Branch, one of the original firemen at Parkhead told me the above, in 2008, I assumed it was for 1952 but after talking to Bill Cook it must have been later.

  AYS524 Dennis/Morris/Magirus TL
1952 JUS784 Leyland Comet/Windover P
1956 PUS258 Dennis F12/Dennis PE
1962 942FGE AEC Marquis/Haydon WrL
1968 513BGE AEC Mercury/Bennett/Simon SS70 HPP

 

  First Aerial
1976 942FGE 513BGE
1980 KGE451N 513BGE
1983 OGD69V OYS620V
1989 OGD69V RGD999G
1990 F187FHS A834WGG
1994 L727UGA A834WGG
1994 L727UGA F204FHS
2005 SF05DFD F204FHS
2006 SF05DFD  
2006 SF06GCU  

 

513BGE AEC/Bennett/Simon SS70 HP
942FGE AEC/Haydon WrL
RGD999G AEC Mercury/J C Bennett/Simon SS70 HP
KGE514N Dodge K850/Fulton and Wylie WrL
OGD69V Bedford KG/HCB Angus CSV/Fulton and Wylie WrL
OYS620V Shelvoke & Drewry WY/Simon 70' PHP
A834WGG Shelvoke & Drewry WY/Saxon/Simon SS263 HP
F187FHS Scania 82M/Angloco WrL
F204FHS Scania 93M/Metz/Angloco TL
L727UGA Scania G93M-210/Emergency One WrL
SF05DFD Scania 94D-260/Saxon RPL
SF06GCU Scania P310 CP14 6x2 RS/JDC/Vema 28M ARP

 

Notes

Parkhead Fire Station will be closing on the 29th March, 2011 and moving to the new Clydesmill Community Fire Station at Clydesmill Industrial Estate, Cambuslang.

When Parkhead opened it allowed the old war time temporary Tollcross fire station which was in a portion of the Miners Welfare Institute in Corbett Street to close.

Glasgow Corporation, Police etc. Committee, Page 1226           1/12/1952
Parkhead Fire Station - Catering facilities - Grant of crockery etc.
There was submitted a letter of date 13th ultimo from the Area Secretary, The Fire Brigades Union, along with a report thereon by the Firemaster, regarding the provision of crockery, etc., in connection with the catering facilities at Parkhead Fire Station, and, after consideration, the sub committee agreed that an inaugural supply of crockery, etc., on the lines now indicated be supplied on the understanding that all replacements would be supplied by the personnel. 

Glasgow Corporation, Police etc. Committee, Page 1060           3/11/1952
Parkhead Fire Station, Cuthelton Street – Employment of telephonists
The Firemaster, by letter of date 29th ultimo, reported regarding the staffing of the Watchroom at the new Parkhead Fire Station at Cuthelton Street, and, after consideration, the sub committee agreed that five female telephone operators be employed at that station in a temporary capacity against the department’s establishment of operational firemen.

1952 to 1975

Glasgow Fire Service

1975 to 2005

Strathclyde Fire Brigade

2005 to Strathclyde Fire and Rescue (Name change only.)

Approval has been granted to close two fire stations in the east of Glasgow and replace them with a single station costing £5m. Board members of Strathclyde Fire and Rescue gave their backing to the plan, which will see the closure of Cambuslang and Parkhead fire stations, at a meeting in Hamilton yesterday.
(The Herald, Saturday, February 10, 2007. Page 4.)

This was the first station to be built and officially opened by the Glasgow Fire Authority since 1916. It was intended to serve the extreme east end of the city with the various new housing and industrial developments there, it was a single storey building with a three bay appliance room. It was cut down in size from an original three storeys because of financial stringency. One feature was that it was the first station in Scotland in which the men would operate a shift system designed to eliminate any necessity for living on the premises.

First station to be built in Glasgow without accommodation for the firemen.

In 1975 this was station A3 in the Glasgow Fire Service.

Originally Station B7 at start of Strathclyde Fire Brigade the station call sign was changed to U03 on 30/9/2005 during a reorganisation of Commands into Areas.

With the restructure of the three Glasgow Areas into two, approved by the Board on the 8th of April 2010, North East Glasgow was split between North West Glasgow, name now changed to North Glasgow, and South Glasgow with Parkhead moving to South Glasgow and on the 16th November 2010 the station call sign for Parkhead was changed from U03 to V06.

 

 

GLASGOW NEW FIRE STATION OPENED

The need for greater recruitment to the Auxiliary Fire Service was emphasised in Glasgow yesterday at the opening by the Lord Provost Mr Thomas A Kerr of Cuthelton Street Fire Station, Tollcross, the first new station completed by Glasgow Fire Authority since 1916.
He expressed satisfaction that the fire service in Glasgow remained under the control of the Corporation, the only Scottish local authority in that position.

324 OUT OF 1414

The completion of a new Scottish fire station, said Sir Charles Cunningham Secretary, Scottish Home Department, was an event, and Glasgow could take pride in Cuthelton Street. He hoped that it might serve as a model for future programs and stimulate recruitment to the A.F.S. in Glasgow where only 324 of the 1414 volunteers required had come forward.
Firefighting had now become a science demanding scientific tools, good equipment, good buildings, and men of intelligence, character, and good physique. The fire services generally were conscious of their roll in saving life and preventing damage. In Britain last year damage caused by fire amounted to £22,000,000 and in Glasgow to more than £640,000.
Councillor Edward Hunter, convener of the police committee, who introduced Mr Kerr, said that Cuthelton Street was the first station built by the Glasgow fire authority since 1916. The North Western station had been completed in 1941, but it was established by the war time national authority. The new station was intended to serve Shettleston, Tollcross, Springboig, Queenslie, Barmulloch, and projected housing developments towards the eastern boundary of the city.

SPECIAL FEATURES

After the Lord Provost had broken an alarm which sent out two units on a demonstration, the firemaster, Mr Martin Chadwick, explained to representatives of the corporation and neighbouring fire authorities the special features of the station.
The station is the first in Scotland in which firemen will work a shift system designed to eliminate the need for living on the premises. The single storey building, which is radio equipped is capable of extension, and in addition to a direct link with fire headquarters in Ingram Street has appliance and operations rooms, joiner and repair shops, and accommodation for staff.
(The Glasgow Herald, Friday, December 5, 1952. Page 7.)

 

OPENING OF THE NEW PARKHEAD FIRE STATION

It is therefore with infinite pride that I have to record that the Rt. Hon. The Lord Provost of Glasgow, Thomas A. Kerr, Esq., J.P., officially opened the new Parkhead Fire Station on. Thursday, 4th December, 1952, in the presence of a distinguished company which included the Lady Provost. Also present were Sir Charles Cunningham. K.B.E., Secretary of the Scottish Home Department and representing the Secretary of State for Scotland, accompanied by R. S. Nixon Esq., Assistant Secretary, Fire Brigades Division, Scottish Home Department, and H.M. Inspector of Fire Services for Scotland, Mr. A. D. Wilson. The Glasgow Corporation were represented by the Convener of the Police, Fire Brigade and Lighting Committees, Councillor Edward Hunter, J.P., and the Sub-Convener, Councillor Thomas Creaney, along with the members of the Police, Fire Brigade and Lighting Committees, also many other members of the G1asgow Corporation in addition to numerous Departmental Chiefs of the various Glasgow Corporation Departments. Firemasters and representatives from the various fire authorities throughout Scotland were also present.
Councillor Edward Hunter, Convener of the Police, Fire Brigade and Lighting Committees, who introduced the Lord Provost, Mr. Kerr, said that the new Parkhead Fire Station was the first Station to be built and officially opened by the Glasgow Fire Authority since 1916 (The North West Fire Station was completed in 1941 but it was established by the war-time national authority.) Mr. Hunter stated that the new Parkhead Fire Station was intended to serve Shettleston, Tollcross, Springboig, Queenslie, Barmulloch and projected housing and industrial developments towards the eastern boundary of the City. He had no hesitation in stating that from his knowledge of the Glasgow Fire Service, both operationally and administratively, the City of Glasgow possessed one of the finest Fire Services not only in Scotland but the United Kingdom. He also mentioned that in view of the great potential fire risk which existed in this City of Glasgow, it would be necessary in the near future for Fire Stations to be erected at Drumchapel Garthamlock and Castlemilk, thus providing the necessary fire protection in these new housing and industrial areas, and he was satisfied that approval would in due course be granted to the Glasgow Corporation and the Scottish Home Department.
In conclusion Councillor Hunter stated that he had now come to an important moment and that was to the effect that he had very much pleasure in calling upon the Rt. Hon. The Lord Provost of Glasgow, Thomas Kerr, J.P., to officially declare open this new Parkhead Fire Station. In a very nice tribute he stated that many famous and eminent men had occupied this very high post of Lord Provost of this great City of Glasgow but none more so than the present Lord Provost and it afforded him unbounded pleasure to now ask the Lord to officially dedicate the new Parkhead Fire Station.
The Lord Provost, after thanking the Convener, Councillor Hunter, for his very nice tribute, proceeded to state that he was always very much interested in the Glasgow Fire Service and he was proud of thee fact that it was during his period of Convenership of the Police, Fire Brigade and Lighting Committees that the Government decided, after prolonged negotiations, to return the Fire Services to the control of the local authorities and he thought this example could be well copied in many other directions. The Lord Provost also humorously stated that it was always his ambition, since a small boy of tender years, to break a fire alarm and on one occasion he almost. succeeded by climbing on the shoulders of another young boy but just when he thought he had achieved his objective he received a very sudden reminder, like a bolt from the blue, from behind which dispelled any further idea he had in his mind of breaking a fire alarm. (This remark caused much merriment among the assembly present.)
Lord Provost then took the gavel, which was specially provided for this occasion for breaking the glass of the fire alarm, in his hand and stated that he was now about to achieve an ambition which had remained with him since he was a small boy, i.e., to smash a fire alarm. The Provost then proceeded to smash the glass and immediately thereafter pressed the alarm. Simultaneously two fire appliances took their departure from the new Parkhead Fire Station on their initial journey from that Station, thus signifying the official opening of the new Station.
The Convener, Councillor Hunter, thanked Lord Provost T. Kerr for so kindly agreeing to open the Parkhead Fire Station and for the very interest that he always had, and still continues to manifest in the Glasgow Fire Service. Mr. Hunter thereafter called upon Sir Charles Cunningham, K.B.E., C.B., C.V.O., Secretary, the Scottish Home Department. Sir Charles stated that this new Station was one in which Glasgow could take infinite pride and he hoped that it might serve as a model for future progress and stimulate recruitment to the Auxiliary Fire Service in Glasgow where only 324 had come forward. Sir Charles further stated that fire fighting had now become a science demanding scientific tools, good equipment, good stations and men of intelligence, character and good physique. The Fire Service generally were conscious of their role in saving life and preventing damage. In the United Kingdom last year damage caused by fire amounted to £22 million and in Glasgow to more than £640,000.
Councillor Thomas Creaney, Sub-Convener, thanked Sir Charles for the splendid assistance and co-operation which they had received from the Scottish Home Department in permitting the completion of this new Station and which was very much appreciated by the Glasgow Corporation. Councillor Creaney also thanked the Master of Works and City Engineer’s Department together with contractors and all personnel who were associated in the completion of this Station.
After an adjournment had been made for afternoon tea, the Firemaster addressed the meeting and explained to the various members of the Glasgow Corporation and neighbouring fire authorities the special features of the new Station. He mentioned that the Parkhead Fire Station was the first in Scotland in which firemen operate a shift system designed to eliminate the need for living on the premises. The single storied building which is radio equipped is capable of extension and, in addition to a direct line with Fire Force Headquarters in Ingram Street, has appliance and operations rooms. The Firemaster also emphasised that the foundations of the Station are so constructed that it would be possible in the near or distant future to add another one or two floors if so desired without in any way interfering with the structural foundation.

PARKHEAD FIRE STATION

Planning

As originally envisaged, Parkhead Fire Station was designed with all necessary services for independent operation. It was to be of three floors in height and contained a three-bay appliance room, offices, dormitories, billiard and quiet rooms, recreation room, dining rooms, kitchen, etc. Engine repair, machine and paint shops with subsidiary buildings containing plumber’s and joiner’s shops, together with a hose tower and heating chamber.
It was decided, however, at Home Department level that the original Schedule of Accommodation would have to be cut down to meet the then prevailing financial conditions and accordingly, after meetings between the Home Department and Corporation officials, it was decided to build a single storey Station containing appliance room and the minimum number of essential apartments necessary to enable the Station to be fully manned operationally, and constructed in such a manner as to permit of the upper floors being completed at a future date.
The building, as designed by the Architectural Section of the Office of Public Works and as subsequently built, comprises a three-bay appliance room set back on the angle at the junction of four roads, this situation giving appliance drivers a clear field of view in all directions as they leave the Station. The wings on either side of the appliance room are connected directly to it and also have separate access both to the street and the Station yard.
The administrative section on one side has the following apartments – watch room, Company Officer’s office, muster and equipment bay, mess and recreation room, Officers’ mess, kitchen and male and female toilets. The watch room has a large circular window overlooking the entrance doors and another window overlooking the appliance room. The watch room attendant sitting at the control panel adjacent to this window has therefore full control of all movement both inside and directly outside the appliance room. The equipment bay, which is directly entered from the appliance room, contains first reserve stores of hose, etc.
The dormitory wing contains sleeping and locker accommodation for the complete shift of Firemen, Leading Firemen, Section Leaders and Company Officer, the men’s dormitory being immediately adjacent to the appliance room. This wing also contains a heating chamber and the water storage tank.
The rear appliance room doors open direct to the drill yard, which has access from the street for returning appliances. An underground petrol storage tank with pump is installed at the rear of this yard

Construction

The building generally is constructed of load bearing cavity walls with internal steel stanchions carrying beams supported between them and the external walls. A section of the appliance room, over which the recreation room will ultimately be located, is framed with steelwork encased in concrete.
The app1iance room and dormitory have an access duct passing under them and the floors of these two apartments are built on the solid ground whilst all other floors are constructed of precast concrete units with service space beneath.
The roofs are also of precast concrete units and are designed to take the full floor loads which will be necessary for the final scheme.
Internal walls, all of which are non-load bearing, are of breeze concrete.

External Finishing

The elevations are faced with Redac plastic clay facing brick built with ½ in. struck weathered horizontal joints. The copes, canopies over appliance room doors and side entrance doors and surrounds to windows, etc., are of cast stone. The base of the elevations facing the street, the pilasters and jambs of the appliance room doors and the features of two side entrance doors are in black and oatmeal coloured faience.
The appliance room doors are of teak, set in heavy teak frames. Each door section is two-thirds glazed with ¼ in. polished plate glass. The side entrance doors and gate to drill yard are of teak and the inner vestibule doors are fully glazed, set in teak frames.
Window frames throughout are metal casements.
All roofs are finished with ¾ in. asphalt, laid on foam slag concrete screeding.

Internal Finishing

Appliance Room
Floor finish—2 in. thick Ruabon tiles laid on reinforced concrete bed. The tiles are in contrasting colours to clearly indicate the safe wheel setting for appliances.
Wall finish ~Faience tiles from floor to ceiling.
Ceiling finish—Hardwall plaster on plaster board fixed to 2 x 2 celcurised timber branders.
Watch Room, Company Officer’s Room, Mess and Recreation Rooms Officers’ Mess Room and Dormitories
Floor finish—Alamac articulated hardwood flooring.
Walls and ceiling finish—Hardwall plaster.
Corridors
Floor finish—Terrazzo.
Walls arid ceiling finish—Hardwall plaster.
Kitchen, Toilets, Ablution Room and Drying Room
Floor and wall finish—Terrazzo
Ceiling finish—Plaster
InternaI Pass Doors
Multigon flush panelled.

Services

Electrical
Flourescent fittings are installed in the appliance room, watch room, administrative wing corridor mess and recreation room, kitchen and officers mess. All other apartments have filament lamps with spherical shades.
There is a system of call bells and loud speakers throughout the Station which together with the lighting in the operational rooms, is controlled from the control panel in the watch room.
Heating
The Station is centrally heated throughout by means of an accelerated low pressure hot water system, designed to maintain temperatures varying from 55°F. to 75°F. in various apartments when the temperature of the external air is 30°F.
The heating boiler is an Ideal No. 38 K Britannia pattern having a maximum output rating of 511,000 B.T.U.’s/hour.
Hot Water Service
The hot water service is provided by a No. H.W.S. 50 pattern boiler with a maximum output rating of 175,500 B.T.U.’s/hour.
Special Equipment
The appliance room is equipped with engine heater and charging panels set in the ceiling directly over the appliance, and tyre inflation equipment is provided at two convenient points in the appliance room.
Kitchen
The kitchen is fitted out with stainless steel sinks and draining boards, and has a large electric cooker and oven and a refrigerator
The building was erected in seventeen months and the total cost, inclusive of furnishings, was £33,000.
(Report of the Firemaster of the City of Glasgow 1952. Pages 6 to 11.)

I am very pleased to mention that two new Fire Stations have in the interval been opened, viz., the new Parkhead Fire Station, which was declared open by the Rt. Hon., the Lord Provost of Glasgow, Thomas A. Kerr, Esq., J.P., on Thursday, 4th December, 1952, in the presence of a distinguished company, which included the Lady Provost, also, Sir Charles Cunningham, K.B.E., Secretary of the Scottish Home Department, representing the Secretary of State for Scotland, who was accompanied by the late R. S. Nixon, Esq., Assistant Secretary, Fire Brigades Division, Scottish Home Department, and H.M. Inspector of Fire Services for Scotland, Mr. A. D. Wilson. The Glasgow Corporation were represented by the Convener of the Police, Fire Brigade and Lighting Committees, Councillor Edward Hunter, J.P., and the Sub Convener, Councillor Thomas Creaney, J.P., along with the members of the Police, Fire Brigade and Lighting Committees.
(Report of the Firemaster of the City of Glasgow 1958. Page 7)

 

Serving the East End for 50 golden years
Report: Garry McConnachie 

An East End fire station celebrated its 50th anniversary this week as the fire brigade dispute rumbled on.
Parkhead Fire Station officially opened its doors on December 4, 1952.
One of the original firefighters based at the station was Sandyhills resident Wallace Branch.
Wallace joined the service at the age of 27 and worked in the fire station in Cuthelton Street from the day it opened until 1955, before he was transferred to Ingram Street Fire Station.
He told the GEN: “At that time it was a beautiful building and was always kept immaculate.
“It had massive bay windows and inside it had polished wood flooring, which gave it a very prestigious look.
“In fact, the station was so proud of its look that all the girls who worked in the control room, there were six girls in total, were not allowed to wear stiletto heels in case the wood was scratched.
“At that time it was also compulsory for the girls in the control to be single. If at any time one of them decided to get. married, they were made to take compulsory retirement. How times have changed.
“The station itself was seen as a refuge for everyone who lived in the area. If anyone had a problem and needed to call the police or a midwife, then we would do that for them. We had the telephone and at that time hardly anyone had access to a phone.”
The Parkhead station was the workplace for 32 firemen. They covered the East End from Yate Street at the Gallowgate to Riddrie, and as far south as
Dalmarnock Road.
The station’s Golden Jubilee celebrations may have been overshadowed by the current dispute but like many members of the public, Wallace believes the firefighters deserve more money.
He said: “During my time as a fireman we earned £15 per week, and that was quite a lot.
“To my mind they deserve every penny they are asking for, because they are dedicated to their job and saving lives.
“Firefighters risk their lives every day when they get called out to a fire, and that is something which involves their whole family.
“When a fireman is at his work, his family will be worrying about the dangers they could be facing during their shift. I certainly support them in their fight for an increase in pay.”

PICTURED above are some of the members of Red Watch at Parkhead Fire Station in December 1952.
They are: Section Leader T Cook, W Branch, W Hamilton, W Cook, J Dunn, D Cameron and Company Officer R Angus
. (This picture is reversed, number plate reads backwards)
(Unknown newspaper, possibly “The Gem” 2002)

 

 

If you know of any mistakes in this or have any additional information please let me know.

 

MAIN INDEX                         1975 INDEX                         STRATHCLYDE INDEX