S02 PAISLEY

1 Aerial Rescue Pump, 1 Rescue Pump Ladder,  Wholetime

Stations

1800 Meal Market, Weight House Close, High Street
1834 Engine House, Gilmour Street
1853 32 High Street
1877 Rear of Moss Street
13/4/1899 to 28/3/1973 16 Johnstone Street, PAISLEY                                          Photo
28/3/1973 Canal Street, PAISLEY, PA1 2HQ                                     Photo

 

Firemasters

1833 Captain Alexander Wallace
1838 Captain Charles Wallace
1857 to Captain Joseph Green
1862 Captain James Gillespie
1877 to 1922 Firemaster Arthur McNaughton
1922 to 1927 Firemaster John Smith
1927 to 1937 Firemaster Alexander Girdwood
1937 to 1939 Firemaster Robert Bowman
30/9/2005 Station Manager Alan Smith
2006 Station Manager 'B' Bob Flynn (Temp)
2007 Station Manager Alan Smith

 

 

Appliances

1760   Two Fire Engines  
1800   Two Manual Fire Engines  
1877   One Steam Fire Engine and One Manual Pump  
1899   One Steam Fire Engine and Two Pipe Carriages  
1912   Halley Motor Fire Engine  
1915 XS1 Ford T Type M/Tender
1923 XS1 Halley Ho/Tndr
  XS263 Halley P
1924? XS1234 Dennis MP
1926 XS1554 Leyland/Magirus TL
  XS3200 Leyland MP
  XS5454 Leyland TLM/Merryweather TL
1936   New Leyland and a Dennis appliance  
  LHS964 Dennis F8 P

 

  

      

First

Second

TL

HL/FoT

Retained

1954

EHS567

HHS173

XS5454

GLT732*

XS3200

1958

EHS567

MHS162

XS5454

GLT732*

JHS49

1960

EHS567

MHS162

RHS180

GLT732*

JHS49

1961

EHS567

MHS162

RHS180

GLT732#

JHS49

1962

EHS567

UHS711

RHS180

RHS520

JHS49

1965

FHS385C

UHS711

RHS180

RHS520

JHS49

1968

FHS385C

SHS405G

RHS180

RHS520

JHS49

1974

UHS544M

SHS405G

RHS180

SHS721M

JHS49

1980

XUS196S

UHS544M

RHS180

          

SHS405G

1983

LGD625Y

LGD628Y

NHS993V

 

 

1989

E144XDS

D192PGD

D549RGG

 

 

1993

K374MYS

K376MYS

D549RGG

 

 

2000

K374MYS

V758NGD

D549RGG

 

 

2003

K374MYS

V758NGD

M58FYS

 

 

2004

SF53POJ

SF53YMC

M58FYS

 

 

2007

SF07EKJ

SF53YMC

 

 

 

2009

SF07EKJ

SF59CYC

 

 

 

2016

SF07EKJ

SL64MDJ

 

 

 

 

GLR726

Austin K2

FoT

GLT732

Austin K2

HLL

XS3200

Leyland

MP

XS5454

Leyland TLM/Merryweather

TL

EHS567

Dennis F7

MP

HHS173

Dennis F8

MP

JHS49

Dennis F8

MP

MHS162

Dennis F8

MP

RHS180

AEC Mercury/Merryweather

TL

RHS520

Austin FFG/HCB  (2 miles of hose)

HL/FoT

UHS711

Dennis F26

WrT

FHS385C

Dennis F38

WrT

SHS405G

Dennis F108/Dennis

WrL

SHS721M

Ford D0600

HL/FoT

UHS544M

Dodge K850/Fulton and Wylie

WrL

XUS196S

Dodge K1113/Fulton and Wylie

WrL

LGD625Y

Bedford KG/Fulton and Wylie Fire Warrior

WrL

LGD628Y

Bedford KG/Fulton and Wylie Fire Warrior

WrL

NHS993V

Shelvoke and Drewry WY/Merryweather

TL

D192PGD

Scania 82M/Fulton and Wylie

WrL

D549RGG

Scania 92M/Angloco/Metz

TL

E144XDS

Scania 82M/Fulton and Wylie

WrL

K374MYS

Scania 93M-210/Emergency One

WrL

K376MYS

Scania 93M-210/Emergency One

WrL

M58FYS

Scania P113-320/Angloco/Bronto F32HDT

ALP

V758NGD

Scania 94D-220/Emergency One

WrL

SF53POJ

Scania 94D-260/Saxon

RPL

SF53YMC

Scania 94D-260/Saxon

RPL

SF07EKJ

Scania P310 CP14 6x2 RS /JDC/Vema 282

ARP

SF59CYC

Scania P270/Polybilt/JDC

RPL

SL64MDJ

Scania P280/JDC

RPL

 

 ARP went on the run Tuesday 8/5/2007

 

Notes

New Station for Camphill, Paisley September 1972?

Strathclyde Regional Council Police and Fire Committee approved disbandment of Retained Unit (5 Men) 14/8/1980.

1760 to 1941 Paisley Fire Brigade
1941 to 1948 National Fire Service
1948 to 1975 Western Area Fire Brigade
1975 to 2005 Strathclyde Fire Brigade
2005 to 2013 Strathclyde Fire & Rescue (Name change only.)
1/4/2013 Scottish Fire and Rescue Service

 

 

 

REGULATIONS

for the

PAISLEY

Fire Engine Establishment

1833

PAISLEY

 

PRINTED BY NEILSON AND HAY

 

REGULATIONS

for the

Paisley Fire Engine Establishment

 

COMMITTEE

Town Councillors

Messrs. John Fleming, Convener

 

Peter Brough

 

Alexander M’Queen

Insurance Agents

Ninian Hodgert, Treasurer

 

John Crawford, Secretary

Paisley, 23rd September, 1833

The following regulations have been drawn up by the fire Engine Committee, and have received the approbation of the Provost and baillies of the Town, and of the Sheriff of the County, and the same are now published for the information of the Fireman, and of the inhabitants for their guidance in all cases of fire.

I. GENERAL REGULATIONS

1st In the event of a Fire breaking out, the person in possession of the premises shall give instant notice of it at the Police Office, county Buildings; and in the meantime, the utmost care shall be taken, to exclude air, by keeping all doors and windows closed.
2d. The Fire Engine house is situated in Gilmour street, adjoining to the Police Office, and the keys are deposited at the Police Office, and with the Captain of the Firemen.
3d. Individuals having wells on their premises, in the neighbourhood of the Fire, are expected to afford access thereto to the Firemen, and otherwise to aid in procuring as plentiful a supply of water as possible, for the Engines.
4th. Persons residing in Flats in the same Tenement in which the Fire breaks out, or in adjoining properties, are recommended to conduct themselves with as much composure and presence of mind as possible, and to shut their doors and windows,* and on no account to allow them to be opened, or their Goods or Furniture to be removed, unless the Captain of Firemen, or person acting in his absence, shall order otherwise.
5th. Spectators are requested to stand as far back as, possible, to preserve a free passage up and down the street for water, and not to press on the Firemen, nor interfere with them in any manner whatever.
* The propriety of this precaution cannot be too frequently enforced. nothing adds more energy to a Fire than giving access to the air, by opening doors, windows, &c. A Fire will sometimes smother itself and go out, if the air can be excluded.

II POLICE.

1st. On any Watchman discovering Fire, he shall instantly put all concerned on their guard, and. then go, or send notice to. the Police Office by a sure messenger.
2d On notice being received at the Police Office, messengers shall be immediately dispatched by the Serjeant on duty, to the Captain of the Firemen and Captain of the Police; the nearest resident Bailie, the Agent or Agents of the Insurance Offices in which the premises may be insured, (if known;) and special messengers shall be dispatched to Lonend and Linside, desiring the water carts to be sent to town immediately.* The. Captain of Police on arriving at the Fire, shall see. that the Gas is immediately turned off from the main pipe on the premises, and also, that a proper party is formed under his command, for protecting property and preserving order, keeping off the crowd, and maintaining an open space and passages for the Firemen and. others employed. If this party should prove inadequate, the Magistrate in attendance may order out the Constables of the Ward in which the fire occurs, or the Military from the barracks, but neither the Military, nor Constables, shall assume any management, their duty being merely to preserve order and protect property, and to secure a free passage for supplying water.
3d. It shall be part of the duty of the Watchmen and Officers belonging to the Police Establishment, to give the most prompt attendance and assistance in all cases of Fire. It is expected there will be a supply of torches at all times in both Police Offices.
* In the event of a Water Company being established in town this will be rendered unecessary.

III. CAPTAIN OF FIREMEN.

1st. On receiving notice of a Fire, the Captain shall see that the Engines, with all the apparatus, buckets, &c. in complete order, are instantly dispatched, and he shall himself, without a moment’s delay, repair to the spot where the Fire is. He shall take care that the Engines are properly placed so as to be wrought with the greatest effect. He must also adopt every means in his power for, securing a supply of water. All the operations necessary for arresting the progress of the Fire, shall be under his direction, and the Head Enginemen and Firemen, shall obey his orders. He shall also take care that the Engines, Hose, &c., are all cleaned and greased, and put into perfect working condition, after the fire, and that they shall be at. all times kept so. He shall report to the Fire Engine Committee, when any repair is needed.

IV. FIREMEN.

1st. Each Engine shall have six Firemen attached to it, one of whom shall act as head Engine-man, whose duty it will be to direct the discharge pipe of the Engine, and he shall render every assistance to the Captain in taking the Engine to the spot, causing it to be properly supplied with. water, &c., and. neither he nor any of the men shall leave the Engine, unless by special order from the Captain.
2d. The Firemen shall-assemble as speedily as possible at the Engine-house, and they shall act with promptitude and energy under the orders of the Captain and head Engine-men in getting out the Engines and every thing necessary for efficient service at the fire.
3d. As nothing is more hurtful than noise and confusion, it is enjoined on all to observe quietness, regularity, and subordination—to execute readily and silently whatever orders they receive from the Captain or head Engine-men, and to attend to no orders from any other person. They are particularly cautioned not to take any spirituous liquors, and the Captain will see that proper refreshment is procured for them as soon as circumstances permit. Any man who gets himself intoxicated, shall forfeit all claim to wages, and in case of a repetition of the offence, become liable to, be dismissed. Of Firemen, and all having charge, it. is particularly expected that they will preserve their presence of mind, and take care never to lose temper, or give offence by uncivil language or behaviour.
4th. In working the Engines, there is no necessity for violent exertion. This only serves to exhaust the Firemen and to damage the Engine. By regular moderate strokes, the Engine will be worked with more effect.
5th. The Firemen, and all those who may be called on to assist, will receive tickets from the Captain to shew that they are entitled to pay, and as it creates confusion, and impedes the exertions of those regularly employed, when people press their services when not required, no person, without a ticket shall receive payment.

V. CHARGES

1st. The following rates of charge for Engines, and of payment to Firemen have been fixed., by the Committee:-

ENGINES

For Fires occurring within the Parliamentary Boundaries of Paisley.

 

Each Engine

Those offices which have subscribed,

£2 2

Those offices which have not subscribed,

£4 4

Private Individuals uninsured

£3 3

And where more than one Office or Party is concerned, the charge against each will be in proportion to the above rates, and to their respective interests.
For Fires occurring beyond the Parliamentary Boundaries, a charge will be made according to circumstances.

 

FIREMEN

 

1st Hour.

Every other Hour.

Captain,

7s. 6d.

2s. 6d.

Head Engine-men,

3s.

1s.

Firemen,

2s.

1s.

Assistants at Engines,

0s. 6d.

0s. 6d.

 

A Premium of 5s. will be allowed to the party who takes the first Engine to the Fire.

No pay will be allowed in cases of false alarm.

Each individual belonging to the establishment will receive a copy of these regulations, and it is expected that he will, on every occasion, be found acting in conformity to them.

NAMES OF FIREMEN.

Mr. JOHN GILLESPIE, Captain.

  First Engine—Red. Second Engine—Green.
 

1. Alex. Mair, Head Engine.-man

1. R. Walker, Head Engine-man

 

2. Peter Campbell,

2. John M’Intosh,

 

3. Barnet Woods,

3. James Moyes,

 

4. George Drummond,

4. Peter Divan,

 

5. James Malt,

5. John Fletcher,

 

6. Robt. Leighton,

6. John Walker.

 

JOHN FLEMING, CHAIRMAN.

Revised and approved of

JOHN ORR, PROVOST.

ALEX. CAMPBELL, Sh: Sub:

 

 

1836/37

Firemen

 

Alexander Wallace Captain

 

 

William Wallace Deputy Captain

 

Green Engine   Red Engine  
No.1 Robert Leighton  serjeant No.1 Gavin Fleming  serjeant
No.2 Robert Eaglesham  corporal No.2 James Muir  corporal
No.3 Charles Wallace No.3 Hamilton Fulton
No.4 James McNaught No.4 Wm. Chalmers
No.5 Joseph Green No.5 David Weir
No.6 Thomas McNee No.6 Wm. McKaig

The Engines and other apparatus, are deposited in Engine House in Gilmour Street (1834 - 1837)

 

THE OPENING OF THE NEW FIRE ENGINE STATION

At the meeting of the Police Commissioners on Monday night, which was held under the presidency of Provost Mackenzie, ex-Provost Clark drew attention to the following paragraph which appeared in the minutes of a meeting of the Fire Engines Committee:- "It was agreed to remit to the convener, sub-convener, Bailie Smith, and Mr. Donald to make arrangements for a formal opening of the new Fire Engine Station." He wished to know if power had been given to these gentlemen to make arrangements for a banquet, or a show of Fire Engines and throwing water about. (Laughter.)
The Provost – I think we should trust in the discretion of the gentlemen.
Ex-Provost Clark stated that it was not creditable for them as Town Councillors to make themselves jolly and happy at the expense of the ratepayer. He moved that they not be allowed to have an entertainment at the expense of the public.
Ex-Bailie Souden pointed out that Mr. Clark was in the same position on the School Board as to the laying of the foundation stone of the Grammer School as he was in connection with this matter. In connection with the Grammer School ceremony there was a tea skiddle – (laughter) – which cost ten times as much as the expense in connection with the opening of the new Fire Engine Station would amount to.
Mr. Brown understood that each member of the Commissioners was to be privileged to invite a friend to be present, but that there was to be no invitation, as hitherto, issued to other Boards in town.
Bailie Hutchison – You and I will get the champagne afterwards.
Mr. Brown – I am willing to stand my own share of the Champagne.
Bailie Hutchison – I think you should give Fullerton’s men a bit feed off it. (Loud laughter.)
The matter dropped.
(The Paisley and Renfrewshire Gazette, March 18, 1899.)

 

THE NEW FIRE ENGINE STATION

<PHOTO> of the new station.
The above is a view of the new Fire Station buildings in Johnston Street, which have just been completed, and the formal opening of which takes place next Thursday. The site of the buildings is about the centre of the south side of Johnston Street, and contains something like forty poles. Full advantage has been taken of the situation by arranging that the main elevation and fire engine run out face Johnston Square, the benefit of the very wide portion of the square being thus obtained. The site is bounded on the north-west by Johnston Street, 150 feet or thereby; on the south-west by Prussia Street, 78 feet or thereby; on the south-east by Gordon’s Lane, 115 feet or thereby; and on the north-east by the property of the Commissioners, 82 feet or thereby. The style of the architecture is baronial. The elevation to Johnston Street has a frontage of 97 feet. The ground floor consists of a large engine-room measuring 53 feet by 32 feet, with four wide run out gateways. To the right is a door for main entrance to the watchroom, telephone exchange, superintendent’s room, and office, while on the left is a recreation room, bath room, and heating chamber. The main building is three storeys in height, the elevation to Johnston Street being flanked by slight projections terminating in gables, while the circular corner is carried up as a tower with steep, slated roof. The elevation to Prussia Street is treated in a similar manner to the Johnston Street elevation, and contains private entrance and stair to superintendent's house. To the rear of the main building is the stable which is directly connected with the fire engine room. The stable has a flat roof with a low parapet, and is lighted from the sides. Accommodation is provided for six horses. The back elevation shows the drying tower 12 feet square and 68 feet high. Immediately adjoining this area are the boiler shed and workshop with hayloft above. The whole of the part occupied by the brigade is heated by radiators supplied by low pressure steam from a special boiler. Ample provision is made for the washing and drying of clothes in connection with the fireman’s houses. The buildings enclose a yard 76 feet by 30 feet or thereby, where every provision is made for the cleaning of fire engines, hose, etc. As to the means of access to the different floors, after careful consideration the open verandah system was adopted as being the most suitable, with a covered stair shaft, the first landing of which leads also to the roof of the stable, which can be utilised as a promanade, or children’s playground. The whole building is lighted with electricity, a switchboard having been arranged by Mr. M’Naughton so that the firemen will not only be rung up should a fire alarm be raised during the night, but also the houses lighted at the same time. The Commissioners, in choosing to fix the situation for the new Fire Station in Johnston Street, have done so in the best interests of all concerned, as from this site very ready and uncongested thoroughfares are available to most parts of the town. The building was designed and carried out under the personal supervision of Mr. John W. Moncur, late Burgh Surveyor, and the following were the contractors:- Mason and brickwork, Morrison &Muir, Glasgow; wrightwork, Alexander M’Naughton; iron and steel work, Hanna, Donald & Wilson; plumber work, Barr & Provan; plaster work, Wm. Spiers; slater work, J. Jeffrey & Co.; heating, James Boyd & Sons; gasfittings, James Kilpatrick & son; electric installation, George Robertson & Sons; painting work, Andrew Fernie – all of Paisley. Mr. James Rodger acted as Clerk of Works. The estimated cost is between £7000 and £8000.
(The Paisley and Renfrewshire Gazette, April 8, 1899. Page 5.)

 

THE NEW FIRE ENGINE STATION

OPENING CEREMONY

The ceremony of opening the new Fire Engine Station buildings of which we gave a view and description in our last issue, was performed on Thursday, at noon, by ex-Bailie Souden, convener of the Fire Engine Station Committee. Provost Mackenzie presided over the gathering, and among those present were Bailies Smith, Galbraith, Hutchison, Wilson and Allison, Treasurer Mathieson, ex-Treasurer Paton, ex-Bailies Bell, Donald, & Andrew, Councillors Adam, Bryce, Kent and Russell, Mr. G. R. Hyslop, gasworks manager; Mr. T. Walker, Clerk to the Commissioners; Mr. William Walker, Burgh fiscal; Mr. James Young, Town Clerk; Provost Thomson, Johnstone; Provost Hays, Barrhead; Mr. Rome, interim master of works; Mr. Foulds, master of works office; Rev. Mr. A. M. Lang. Mr. Thomson, fireman to Messrs. J. & P. Coats; Mr. Wm. M’Naughton, superintendent of Fire Brigade; Mr. W. Paterson, superintendent of Glasgow Fire Brigade; Mr. Dunsmore, fireman to Messrs. Wotherspoon; Mr. Taylor superintendent of Greenock fire Brigade; Mr. James Scarlett, chairman of Parish Council; Mr. T. M’Bride, fireman to Messrs. Clark & Co.; Mr. William W. Kelso, sanitary inspector; Mr. Wilson, jeweller; Mr. Francis Tongue, electric engineer; Mr. Wilson, Anchor Mills; Mr. A. M’Naughton, Mr. D. M. Wilson, Mr. Daniel Mackenzie, and others.
The Provost in his introductory remarks, pointed out that some time ago the Commissioners realised the necessity of having a new Fire Engine Station. They appointed a committee for the purpose of seeing to the work being carried out, and ex-Bailie Souden was elected chairman. The result of the committee’s work was to be seen that day. (Applause.) He then called upon Mr. M’Naughton to perform a pleasing part of the day’s function.
Mr. A. M’Naughton, in the absence of the principal contractor, presented ex-Bailie Souden with a handsome gold key and Councillor Adam, sub-convener of the committee with an appendage. The key bore the following inscription:- "Presented by the contractors to William Souden, Esq., convener of Lighting, Watching and Fire Engine Committee on the occasion of his opening the Fire Brigade Station, Paisley, 13th April, 1899."
The appendage which was presented to Councillor Adam bore a somewhat similar inscription.
Ex-Bailie Souden returned thanks and, in declaring the premises open, said that it was now twenty years since a new Fire Station began to be talked of; but it only took definite shape some five years ago, when a committee of the Council was deputed to make all enquires, and to visit the more recently erected Fire Stations, such as Glasgow and Belfast, and to report. The result was that plans were prepared by Mr. Moncur, aided by Superintendent M’Naughton, of the Fire Brigade, and in due course, without any friction between the committee and the builders the Station had been completed. He thought, though there was difference of opinion at first about the extent of the Station, now that it had been completed he might hope there was none who would deny the thing was a stern necessity. That a town of the population of Paisley, with such an immense value in property, should be able to cope vigorously with the devouring element, could not be gainsaid; and that they should be able to do on, anyone who had examined the building and all the appliances could not have a doubt. (Applause.) It was extremely gratifying that they had got a site unsurpassed, in the very centre of the town, about a mile and a quarter from the Burgh boundary all round. The growth and value of the town made a new station a necessity, for the burning of a mill or factory not only means the destruction of valuable property but the throwing idle of men and women on whom others depend on their daily bread. (Hear, Hear.) They had a splendid Fire Brigade Station in every way equipped up to date, and they had the men’s houses, but they had yet the question of fire alarms throughout the town to take up and consider. He was sure it was their hope, as it was his, that the Brigade would be seldom called out, but when it was, they would be ensured that every man of them would be a hero, and to do his utmost to save life and property. He concluded by again returning thanks. (Applause.)
On the motion of ex-Bailie Souden, the Provost was accorded a hearty vote of thanks.
The company was treated to an exhibition of the Brigade’s ability to turn out on a fire alarm being given, and after being photographed they adjourned to the Art Gallery of the George A. Clark Town Hall, where

LUNCHEON

was served to about fifty gentlemen. Provost Mackenzie presided, and supporting him on the platform were the Rev. A. M. Lang, Provost Heys, Provost Thomson, Bailies Smith and Galbraith, Mr. Daniel Mackenzie, Mr. W. Paterson, Glasgow; Mr. James Scarlett, and Mr. M’Naughton, firemaster. After luncheon, apologies for absence were intimated by Mr. T. Walker, clerk to the Commissioners, as follows:- Sir Thomas Glen-Coats, Mr. Stewart Clark, Sheriff Henderson, Bailie Cleland, Glasgow; Bailie Nicolson. Provost Brown, Renfrew; Provost M’Master, Port Glasgow; ex-Provost Johnstone, Paisley; Mr. Morrison, mason; Mr. Martin, Town Clerk; Rev. Mr. Fleming, Mr. Moncur, late Burgh Surveyor; and Mr. Alexander. Mr. Moncur, in his letter, stated that at present he was engaged designing a new Fire Engine station for Sunderland, which was on somewhat similar lines to that in Paisley.
The toast of "The Queen" was given from the chair and enthusiastically pledged.
Provost Heys, in proposing "The Provost, Magistrates, and Town Council," complimented them upon the manner in which they conducted their business.
Provost Mackenzie, in replying, said that he thought by and by, with the new and increasing functions and duties that they would have to undertake in the Town Council, it would be impossible for any man to enter it unless he was retired from private business.
Mr W. Paterson, firemaster, Glasgow, proposed "The Fire Engine Committee" and in doing so stated that the new Fire Station of Paisley was one of the best that he had seen in this country, and certainly it reflected great credit upon the Town Council, the Fire Engine Station Committee, and all who had anything to do with its erection. (Applause.) The Town Council had done a wise thing in spending money on such a building, which, he was sure, would serve them for at least the next fifty years. He was sure the result of the Committee’s efforts must be satisfactory both to them and the community of Paisley. (Applause.)
Ex-Bailie Souden in acknowledging the toast, said that the station was efficiently manned and equipped, and consequently when fire broke out they had the proper forces in readiness to extinguish it with the least possible delay. (Applause.) He trusted that they would never have a serious conflagration, but if they had to fight the flames they had the engines, the men, and the courage too. (Laughter and applause.)
Mr Adam gave the toast of "The Architect, Mr. Moncur, and his assistant, Mr. Rome. "He believed that they were all impressed with the fine proportion and the very elaborate treatment that the building had got. Mr. Rome had been engaged largely in getting up the details of the station, and he had done his work to the satisfaction of the committee, and had earned their thanks for the harmonious way in which he had worked with the Committee. (Applause.)
Mr Rome replied, thanking them for the enthusiastic manner in which they had responded to the toast.
The other toasts were, "The Contractors," proposed by Mr. James Scarlett, acknowledged by Mr. A. M’Naughton; and "The Chairman," given by Mr. D. M. Wilson. At intervals, songs were rendered by various gentlemen.
(The Paisley and Renfrewshire Gazette, April 15, 1899.)

 

 

The Western Fire Area Administration Scheme Order, 1948

  Equipment Whole-time Retained
  1 Turntable Ladder 2 Company Officer  
  3 Self-propelled pumps 4 Section Leaders  
  1 General purpose lorry 4 Leading Firemen 1 Leading Firemen
  1 Light trailer pump * 35 Firemen 9 Firemen
  1 Salvage Tender *    
  1 Portable Power Pump (Area Reserve)    
  1 Standard towing vehicle (Area reserve)    

* This appliance is for alternative manning only.

 

FIRST IN SCOTLAND?
Paisley May Have Two Platoons
When Paisley Corporation reassembles this month after the summer vacation, it will be asked by it’s watching and lighting committee to place the personnel of the brigade on the two watch system.
Paisley is the first Scottish local authority to proceed as far as this where conditions of service in the fire brigade are concerned.
In the event of the proposal being adopted, changes will be made in the plans for the new fire station contemplated by the Corporation.
(Fire, September, 1938. page 78.)

FIRST IN SCOTLAND
Paisley Adopts Two Shift System
As indicated in the September edition of Fire, Paisley has become the first Scottish local authority to place its fire fighting personnel on the two platoon basis. This fact has been well received by the general public, which realises the value of efficient fire protection, as well as by the fire brigade.
The change from the continuous duty system means an increase of personnel by one station officer and 12 firemen. Scale of pay remains unchanged, a rent allowance has been authorised, and there will be one day’s leave every week for members of the two watches, who are now free to live where they please within the town.
Only Chief officer Robert Bowman, Grad.I.FireE., and his deputy will continue to live in the fire station, which is being extended and reconstructed so as to provide three more run outs, new workshops, gymnasium, shower baths, and other amenities.
A Paisley correspondent writing in glowing terms of the Paisley Corporation’s decision states: “We Paisley people are very proud that our fire brigade is the first in our country to go on the two shift system. This serves to increase our confidence in the fire brigade and to emphasise the age old slogan of ‘Keep your eye on Paisley’ ”
(Fire, November, 1938. page 143.)

 

NEW FIRE STATION OPENED

Picture above shows the new building in Canal Street.
Paisley's new fire station in Canal Street was being officially opened today by Sir James Macfarlane, convener of  Renfrew County Council.
Built at a cost of £150,000, the three storey building replaces the old station at Gordon Street, which is to be demolished to make way for road improvements to the new bridge over the White Cart.
The Station, designed by county architect Mr Alexander Farquhar, has four bays which houses five appliances.
Above the appliance bays is a large recreation room, lecture room, officers' dining room, the main dining room and kitchen and toilet facilities. There is direct access to the appliance room by means of two separate pole drops.
Sleeping accommodation is also provided for the 41 firemen and officers and to the rear of the main building is a training room, workshop facilities and 60 foot training tower.
Below : Firemen demonstrate use of the turntable ladder, "rescuing" 19 years old Miss Linda McLay, of Barrhead.
(

BACK IN TIME WITH THE TOWN’S FIRE-FIGHTERS

Special report by Pat Shearer

It was January 1677, when the first semblance of a fire brigade began to take form in Paisley following an instruction from Baillies and Council for the purchase of 24 leather buckets, six iron cleiks and two ladders.
Through voluntary contributions the 'brigade' flourished always on hand to dowse the flames when called upon, until 1733 when a great fire occurred in the town which was to mark yet another change in the structure of the service.
On June 2, fire broke out in a surgeon's shop in St Mirren's Wynd and spread very quickly to Causeyside Street into High Street from the Cross to the Old Bridge.
Around 400 people were rendered homeless out of a population of only 3,400.
Following this, what would probably be the first fire regulations came into force whereby house fronts were required to be constructed of stone instead of wood and roofs were to be covered with slate, tile, lead or stone and not thatch.
By 1760 Paisley had two fire engines and the council instructed that a larger machine with a leather pipe should be purchased in London, and shipped north by sea.
Almost 40 years later the Seedhill Mills were destroyed completely by fire despite efforts of the firemen to dowse the flames.
The following year it was resolved that no fireman should attend a fire without "a jacket, cap and badge' and that every engine should be cleaned by the men at least every 24 hours.
In order to encourage vigilance it was also agreed that five shillings should be paid to the crew of the first tender to attend a call and a subsequent half-crown should be paid for the second engine to arrive.
The first fire station in Paisley was in the Meal Market in Weigh House Close off High Street, where two manual fire engines were housed along with the other apparatus.
With the increase in machinery and the number of firemen growing, the engines were subsequently moved to premises opposite the prison at Gilmour Street. The Brigade by, 1883, consisted of Captain in charge, two sergeants, two corporals and eight firemen.
During this year there was a great fire at the Cross where three buildings were burnt to the ground and one fireman was killed by falling masonary.
Twenty years later the fire station moved to 32 High Street and had a compliment of 14 men.
<PHOTO> Ready for action... 1920s style. The men of Paisley Fire Brigade line up for inspection at the former station in Johnstone Street. (A TL and 3 Pumps, XS1234)
<PHOTO> Marching into the 1990's... firemen outside the Canal Street Station which opened 16 years ago. The Paisley Station has some of the most up to date fire fighting equipment available in the Region and holds one of the fastest turn out records of 45 seconds. (D192PGD, D549RGG, E144XDS.)

A long way from the bucket brigade

but the old principals still exist

In 1973 the West Area Joint Fire Station opened in Canal Street but two years later it was taken under the wing of Strathclyde Fire Brigade following regionalisation.
There are now 79 men in total including four station officers who are in charge of two shifts on a rota basis.
The fire service has come a long way from the leather bucket brigade and boasts three tenders and a turntable ladder machine although, in theory, the old principals still exist.
After each call-out the men are still required to clean their machinery and hang up hoses to dry in special drying sheds at the rear of the station. The machinery is much more sophisticated nowadays as almost every call requires the use of breathing apparatus, such is the content of materials used in modem homes and factories.
This equipment requires to be kept in tip-top condition and checked continually. Firemen are also required, after the basic 16 week training course, to undergo continuous updating in rescue practice, regularly attending courses on the latest toxic materials, first aid and fitness sessions.
Paisley over the years has experienced an increase in call-outs and is now one of the busiest stations in the district answering around 2,500 calls for assistance each year, compared to smaller stations where the average number of calls is in the region of 1,000.
As well as the customary staircase the station boasts the traditional poles which enabled the men to achieve a 45 second turn-out during the day and 90 seconds at night.
The Paisley station, as well as handling a full normal workload, are also on call 24 hours to provide valuable back-up service for the Airport Fire Brigade

Brigade’s worst tragedy – 70 children killed

In September 1877 Paisley Town Council appointed the first professional firemaster, Mr Arthur McNaughton, who was to give 45 years to the service.
By this time the fire station had moved yet again to Moss Street and the town saw the arrival of the first horse-drawn steam fire engine.
At the conclusion of the nineteenth century the new fire station at Johnstone Street opened to accommodate the steam engine, two pipe carriages and hand reel and at least four horses in stables.
The worst disaster in Paisley Fire Brigade’s history was on December 31, 1929, when smoke from a small fire caused panic at a children’s matinee show in the Glen Cinema at the Cross.
Seventy youngsters, aged from 18 months to 12 years, were crushed to death at one of the rear exits.
(The Paisley Post, Friday, January 20, 1989. Page 6.)

 

Hi-tech engines give firefighters an edge

By Jack Mathieson

<PHOTO> Members of the White Watch team at Paisley Fire Station take delivery of one of their new fire engines. With them are Divisional Commander John Martin and Sub Officer Steven McKay. (K374MYS)
Paisley has been given £140,000 worth of ammunition to fight the menace of fire. Two brand new fire engines have been delivered to the Canal Street station, one of the busiest in Scotland.
And in Strathclyde brigade’s ‘C’ division bosses are confident that the high tech vehicles have given local firefighters an effective new weapon.
Equipped with nine litre turbo charged diesel engines, they also have special gear which enables them to induce foam into the water supply.
One of the vehicles is also armed with improved warning devices which can more easily break into a motorist’s concentration.
Instead of two tone horns it has a range of sounds and tones, as well as a flashing light which strikes a driver’s mirror much more effectively.
"A fire station is operational 24 hours a day every day," said divisional officer George Kennedy.
"It has to be a place of high efficiency and sound morale and these new appliances will help with both these things. The men are very, very pleased."
The Paisley station is part of ‘C’ division, which also takes in Johnstone, Renfrew, Barrhead, Clarkston, Port Glasgow, Greenock and Gourock.
As the busiest of the stations, and indeed on of the busiest in the country, it was decided it would be the best place to deploy the new appliances.
The two which are being replaced – one of them has around 80,000 miles on the clock, the other slightly less – are being refurbished before being deployed at quieter stations within the division.
In their new roles they will be operated by part time crews.
Mr Kennedy said that the latest moves would further boost the efficiency of the Strathclyde brigade.
"We have the resources to tackle ant incident," he told the Paisley Daily Express.
"As well as fires we deal with chemical spills and road, rail and aircraft incidents – we have had them all.
"In theory we can put over a hundred appliances on a job."
(The Paisley Daily Express, 26/10/1992.)

 

There is now a Silver Helmet at Paisley Fire Station which belonged to Fireman James Mair, who was killed by a falling wall at a fire in Ferguslie Fire Clay Works on the 29th June, 1899. This helmet was used to collect money for Fireman Mair's dependants immediately after his death. (15/8/1999)

A report dated 14 November 2003 by the Firemaster was submitted on a proposal for the establishment of a Community Safety Education Centre at Paisley Fire Station. The project would convert an existing training building into a purpose built community safety facility which would consist of an experiential smoke room, mock hazard house, computer room and a multi- purpose lecture/meeting room. The main objective of the project would be to teach vital fire safety, social and life skills to children, young persons, vulnerable persons and high risk groups within the locality. It was also proposed that the facility would be a venue for a Fire Cadet Unit comprised of young people who would benefit from or who were in need of regular involvement and social interaction with others within a safe, disciplined but enjoyable environment.
The total capital project costs in 2004/2005 would amount to £197,540 and it was proposed that the project be funded as follows:-
                                                                Local Community Safety Group £25,000
                                                                Strathclyde Fire Brigade £30,000
                                                                Social Inclusion Partnership (SIP) £142,540
Revenue funding in 2005/2006 was estimated to be £24,123. Provision had been made within the Board’s 2004/2005 capital programme for the Brigade’s involvement with the project, subject to the successful outcome of the SIP funding application.
The board decided subject to the successful SIP funding application for the establishment of a Community Safety Education Centre at Paisley Fire Station, that the £30,000 contribution from the Board’s capital programme for 2004/2005, be approved.
(Strathclyde Fire Board minutes, 9/12/2003.)

 

 

See also A Fire History of Paisley

             Fireman James Mair killed at a fire 1899

 

If you know of any mistakes or have any additions to this please let me know.

 

MAIN INDEX                         1975 INDEX                         STRATHCLYDE INDEX